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Marble bust of Cleopatra VII of Egypt from ca. 40-30 BC. An ancient Roman bust of Ptolemaic ruler Cleopatra VII of Egypt wearing a royal diadem band over her hair; dated to the mid-1st century BC (i.e. around the time of her visit to Rome), it was discovered in a villa along the Via Appia. It is now located in the Altes Museum, Berlin, in the Antikensammlung Berlin collection. Sources: Raia, Ann R.; Sebesta, Judith Lynn. (September 2017). "The World of State". College of New Rochelle. Accessed 6 March 2018. "Cat. 22 Tetradrachm Portraying Queen Cleopatra VII". Art Institute of Chicago. Accessed 6 March 2018. Grout, James. (April 1, 2017). "Was Cleopatra Beautiful?". Encyclopaedia Romana. University of Chicago. Accessed 6 March 2018. Credit: Louis le Grand (Public domain)

Marble bust of Cleopatra VII of Egypt from ca. 40-30 BC. An ancient Roman bust of Ptolemaic ruler Cleopatra VII ...(more)

"Cleopatra, queen of Egypt, made history when she made a bet [with Mark Antony, Roman consul in Egypt] that she could eat at one meal the value of a million sisterces. One million sisterces was many years' wages for the average worker. Everyone thought that her wager was impossible. After all, how could anyone eat so much at a single meal? "Cleopatra was able to eat a meal worth so much by putting a million sisterces worth of pearls [according to Pliny, a single pearl] into a glass of vinegar. Then she set the goblet aside while the dinner was served. The vinegar dissolved the pearls. At the end of the meal, when it was time for her to fulfil ...
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. Credit: Rembrandt Peale (Public domain)
. Credit: Rembrandt Peale (Public domain)
According to Maxim magazine, during his tenure as chief executive, "common man" Thomas Jefferson ran up a wine bill of $10,835—in 1776 dollars.
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Barry Diller at the 2009 premiere of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Photographer's blog post about event and photograph. Credit: David Shankbone (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>)

Barry Diller at the 2009 premiere of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Photographer's blog post about event and ...(more)

Where was Renee Zellweger when she won her award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy at the 2001 Golden Globe Awards? Presenter Hugh Grant had to fill time on international TV ("She's under the table? She's disappeared...") while she was summoned... from the ladies' room. Zellweger rushed to the podium, hand clasped over her mouth with mock mortification and rejoiced in the moment—a moment, she said, "I'll never forget—thank you so much! A moment I almost didn't have!" [USA Network's Barry Diller ended up outside the ladies' room with CAA agent Kevin Huvane, hollering Zellweger's name repeatedly while a girl she'd never met before ran in screaming, 'Renee, Renee, Renee!']
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Laffit Pincay Jr. Signed autographed 16x20 Photo (Leaf COA)
Laffit Pincay Jr. Signed autographed 16x20 Photo (Leaf COA)
"The tremendous pressure to be thin has caused jockeys to take diet pills, laxatives or amphetamines, go on fasts, sit in saunas for hours, run in rubber suits and often—as in the case of the late Chris Antley—puke up their meals," says Stuff Magazine. "The problem is nothing new. Horse [flat] racing's winningest rider, Laffit Pincay Jr., was famous for eating half a peanut for lunch."  * Stress-related drug and alcohol abuse is so prevalent among jockeys that, between 1994 and 99 for example, 160 of 900 licensed jockeys in the United States were investigated for substance abuse. 
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. Credit: Allan Ramsay (Public domain)
. Credit: Allan Ramsay (Public domain)
While David Hume was living in Paris, many of the philosophes, perhaps jealous of his success, took to ridiculing his enormous girth. On one occasion, he was greeted, upon entering a room, by d'Alembert quoting from St. John's Gospel: "Et verbum care factumest." (And the word was made flesh) [One of Hume's female admirers then retorted: "Et verbum carum factum est." (And the word was made lovable)]
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. Credit: Alexander Gardner (Public domain)
. Credit: Alexander Gardner (Public domain)
Abraham Lincoln's political nemesis, Stephen Douglas, attempting to discredit him with allusions to his lowly roots, once told a gathering that the first time he had met Lincoln, the latter had served him alcohol across the counter of a general store. "And an excellent bartender he was too," Douglas concluded. After the laughter had died away, Lincoln rose. "What Mr. Douglas says is quite true," Lincoln conceded. "I did keep a general store and sold cotton and candles and cigars and sometimes whiskey—and I particularly remember Mr. Douglas as he was a very good customer. "Many a time I have been on one side of the counter and sold whiskey to Mr. Douglas on the other side," he continued, "but ...
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Wilson Mizner (1876-1933), playwright, raconteur and entrepreneur. Credit: Unknown photographer (Public domain)
Wilson Mizner (1876-1933), playwright, raconteur and entrepreneur. Credit: Unknown photographer (Public domain)
While playing a round of poker with Wilson Mizner one evening, a friend of the writer's hauled out his wallet and added it to the pot. "I call you," he declared. Mizner calmly removed his right shoe and added it to the pot as well. "If we're playing for leather," he declared, "I raise!" [According to the rockumentary This Is Spinal Tap, St. Hubbins is the patron saint of quality footwear.]
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Actress Sybil Thorndike photographed in 1943 while visiting Brisbane, Australia. Credit: Item is held by John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland. (Public domain)

Actress Sybil Thorndike photographed in 1943 while visiting Brisbane, Australia. Credit: Item is held by John Oxley Library, State Library ...(more)

"When Dame Edith Evans and Dame Sybil Thorndike appeared in the same play the theatre's management was faced with a delicate exercise in diplomacy. Who should be given the Number One dressing room? The choice was in no way eased by the fact that the lavish amenities of Number One were matched by those of Number Two, situated a couple of steps up the back staircase. In despair the stage manager approached Dame Sybil and explained the situation. 'There's no problem at all,' she told him. 'Let Edith have Number One. I can climb stairs.'"
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Official photograph portrait of former U.S. President George W. Bush. Credit: Wikipedia user White house photo by Eric Draper. (Public domain)

Official photograph portrait of former U.S. President George W. Bush. Credit: Wikipedia user White house photo by Eric Draper. (Public ...(more)

On September 7th, 1988, President George Bush addressed the American Legion in Louisville, Kentucky. "This is Pearl Harbor Day," he declared. "47 years ago to this very day, we were hit and hit hard at Pearl Harbor..."  Alas, Pearl Harbor was hit on December 7th—putting Bush three months off target. 
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Former American Football player Dick Butkus. Credit: Alan Light (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)
Former American Football player Dick Butkus. Credit: Alan Light (CC BY 2.0)
While running a sweep during a game against the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions star Altie Taylor saw linebacker Dick Butkus—one of the legendary "monsters of the midway"—heading toward him and wisely ran the ball out of bounds. Butkus, irked that he had narrowly missed an opportunity to greet his opponent with a bone-crushing tackle, simply picked Taylor up and threw him into the stands. ["Did the fan who caught Altie," someone later jokingly asked, "get to keep him?"] [Butkus was so tough that opposing players once started a rumor that he held up his socks with thumbtacks.]