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Larry David - What's Your Hebrew Name?
Though he was raised in an ethnically Jewish family in Brooklyn, Larry David rejected his faith and identified as an atheist, a fact that led to a few tense moments with religious members of his family and the local Jewish community. "I said to a rabbi," David later recalled of one such incident, "before my nephew's bar mitzvah... he said, 'What's your Hebrew name?' I said, 'I don't know, but you can call me Chip!'"
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Av Mariano Otero
Enrique Pena Nieto - Three Influential Books
In December 2011, while campaigning in the Mexican Presidential election, Enrique Peña Nieto visited the Guadalajara International Book Fair. Asked to name three books which had influenced him, he mentioned "some parts" of the Bible and the Carlos Fuentes novel The Eagle's Throne. Then, for several excruciating minutes—as the crowd laughed and his wife, a former soap-opera star, squirmed in the front row—he struggled unsuccessfully to name another book. In a tweet, his teenage daughter later damned "all of the idiots who form part of the proletariat and only criticize those they envy." * He also misidentified the author as historian Enrique Krauze.
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Ben Kingsley Gets The Girl?
Though he won raves for unforgettable roles in films like Gandhi, Bugsy (Meyer Lansky), Schindler's List (a Holocaust survivor), and Sexy Beast, Ben Kingsley sometimes tired of such intense performances. "I'd prefer to drive off into the sunset in a Winnebago with a wife, children and Granny, or wear a nice suit and drink a Scotch at the bar," he once confessed. "I can list 10 films where I've played the loneliest men in the world. My agent said, 'You're good at it, Ben. I told him, 'But I'd really like to get the girl at the end.' He suggested, 'What about Jack the Ripper?'"
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Wynonna Judd - Celebrity Pseudonym
Like many celebrities, Wynonna Judd occasionally checked into hotels using a pseudonym. Wynonna must have raised a few eyebrows at the reception desk one day when she registered under the name: "Anita Man" ("I need a man"). [Wynonna's wish was answered when she married her former bodyguard, D. R. Roach, in November 2003.]
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George W. Bush & The Very Hungry Caterpillar
When President George W. Bush visited schools, there was only one book he was sure to read: Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar. "If teachers have put out other books," Nick Clark, the former chief curator and founding director of the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, told The Guardian, "his advance team will clear them." In 1999, Bush, then serving as Governor of Texas, listed The Very Hungry Caterpillar as one of his favorite books from childhood. The only problem? The book (recommended for children aged 1-8) was published in 1969—when Bush was 23 years old.
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Steve Jobs & Steve Wozniak - Employee Number 1
In the book Accidental Empires, Robert X Cringely relates a story about the early days at Apple, when the company had grown to a point where employees no longer knew each other by name and it was necessary to issue name tags. It was decided that they should be numbered and that numbers should be assigned based on the order in which employees had joined the company. Naturally, a problem arose. As Cringely explains: "Steve Wozniak was declared employee number 1, Steve Jobs was number 2, and so on. Jobs didn't want to be number 2. He didn't want to be second in anything. Jobs argued that he, rather than Woz, should have the sacred number 1 since they were ...
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When Alexander Fleming Toured A Modern Lab
Alexander Fleming's famous discovery of penicillin at St Mary's Hospital in 1928 was occasioned by a speck of penicillium notatum mold, from a mycology lab one floor below, fortuitously contaminating an uncovered culture plate while he was away on vacation. Touring a modern research laboratory many years later, Fleming commented with interest upon the dust-free, air-conditioned environment in which its technicians labored. "What a pity you did not have a place like this to work in," his guide remarked. "Who can tell what you might have discovered in such surroundings." Fleming's reply? "Not penicillin!" [Moldy bread was first used to treat infections by the ancient Egyptians. Indeed, Fleming was not even the first person to describe the antibacterial properties ...
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Where The Eiffel Tower Got Its Name
Patriotic Frenchmen (and women), not noted for their love of Germany, may be less than thrilled to learn the source of the name of the famous landmark which graces the southern bank of the Seine River in Paris.  The 300 meter Eiffel Tower was built by Gustave Eiffel, whose upholsterer godfather, born a Boenickhausen, adopted the name Eiffel—because his friends could not pronounce his name—before moving to Paris from Eifel, Germany. 
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When Young Paul Anka Played Topless Clubs
As a teenager, Paul Anka put together a vocal group called The Bobbysoxers and booked them into topless nightclubs. "I was too young to actually be in the club," he recalled years later, "so they made me stay in the dressing room when I wasn't singing." And how did Anka amuse himself while The Bobbysoxers weren't performing? "I'd punch holes in the walls so I could get a look at the girls!" [Fun fact: Anka and his wife gave all of their five daughters names that begin and end with an 'A'.]
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Bahnhof Göttingen
Wolfgang Pauli - The Pauli Effect
It was a standing joke among Wolfgang Pauli's colleagues that the famed theoretical physicist should be kept as far away from experimental equipment as humanly possible. His mere presence in a laboratory, it was said, would cause something to go wrong: the power would fail, vacuum tubes would suddenly leak, instruments would break or malfunction... Indeed, such was the frequency of Pauli-related incidents that the strange phenomenon came to be known as the 'Pauli Effect'.  One day, some important experimental equipment in Professor James Frank's laboratory at the Physics Institute at the University of Gottingen unexpectedly blew up for no apparent reason. Moreover, Pauli, who was on his way to Denmark, had not even entered the building.  Only later ...