books

#books

730 posts
0 followers
Edit Tag
730 posts
36 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Mario Puzo - Who Inspired The Godfather?
In 1965, a Putnam editor happened to stop by the magazine offices where Mario Puzo was working and overheard him telling Mafia stories. The editor offered him a $5,000 advance for a book on the subject and The Godfather was born. Puzo later revealed the model for the character of Don Vito Corleone. It was this person's voice, Puzo declared, that he heard whenever the Godfather spoke: "My mother was a wonderful, handsome woman," Puzo explained, "but a fairly ruthless person." [On Christmas Eve, 1971, Puzo had a severe gall bladder attack. "I had to take a cab to the hospital, got out, and fell into the gutter," Puzo told Time magazine. "There I was, lying there, thinking, 'Here I ...
29 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Umberto Eco: Bibliophile
Umberto Eco loved books. Indeed, such was his passion for papery pleasures that the library in his Milan home once grew so large (some 35,000 volumes, in no particular order) that its floor collapsed![In 1947, Homer and Langley Collyer, the "Hermit Hoarders of Harlem," were discovered dead in their Fifth Avenue mansion amid a hundred and eighty tons of car parts, musical instruments, newspapers, and orange peels. In December 2003, Patrice Lumumba Moore was trapped for two days in his Bronx apartment—beneath his massive collection of books and magazines. The New York Post headline? "Bookworm Squished!"]
177 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
A Visitor Immortalized In Finnegans Wake
Once or twice James Joyce dictated a bit of Finnegans Wake to Samuel Beckett, though dictation did not work very well for him. In the middle of one session there was a knock at the door which Beckett didn't hear. Joyce said, "Come in," and Beckett naturally wrote it down. Later, reading back what he had written, Joyce said: "What's that? 'Come in'?" "Yes, you said that," Beckett replied. Joyce thought for a moment, then said "Let it stand." Joyce in Zürich, c. 1918
27 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Hilaire Belloc - substandard books
To his great embarrassment, Hilaire Belloc was often forced to produce substandard books in order to pay his bills. "During the 1930s in a railway carriage Belloc noticed a man in front of him reading a volume of his History of England. He leaned forward, asked him how much he had paid for it, and—informed of the price—withdrew a corresponding sum from his pocket, gave it to the man, snatched the book from his hand, and tossed it out the window."["My advice to a young writer who is merely thinking of fame," Belloc once wrote, "is to concentrate on one subject. Let him, when he is twenty, write about the earthworm. Let him continue for forty years to write about ...
16 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Cool Compliment
Isaac Asimov, noted for his prolific output, once attended a cocktail party well-stocked with other writers. "When," he asked one, "will you be publishing your next book, Miss Coolidge?""When," Miss Coolidge wryly replied, "will you not be publishing your next book, Mr. Asimov?"[Alan Alda once asked Asimov a similar question: "Why arent you at home writing a book?"]
48 views
0 comments
1 point
0 favorites
Jack Nicholson On Easy Riders, Raging Bulls
Despite Easy Rider's critical accolades and commercial success, bad blood boiled for years between Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda over authorship of the film's script. Needless to say, Hopper was no fan of Peter Biskind's Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, a controversial and critically lauded book which largely supported the Fonda camp. Jack Nicholson was once asked whether he had read the book. His reply? "I don't read fiction." ["I picked it up," Hopper once said of the book, "but when I read my ex-brother-in-law and Peter's partner say I was 'the worst editor he ever saw' and Peter called me 'a fascist punk,' I put it down."] Jack Nicholson in 2001. John Mathew Smith & celebrity-photos.com (CC BY-SA 2.0)
23 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Elmore Leonard: Crackhead Fans
Though he employed a research assistant to assemble background material for his low-life adventures, Elmore Leonard also cultivated many personal contacts on both sides of the law enforcement divide. Leonard was once amused to receive a letter from a convict describing his efforts to convert his fellow inmates from Sidney Sheldon fans to Leonard lovers. While he had managed to switch several former heroin dealers, the fan explained, he had been quite unable to convert afficionados of crack cocaine.[Leonard, best known as a mystery writer, was once honored by the Mystery Writers of America with their Grand Master Award. The Western Writers of America also named Hombre one of the 25 best Westerns of all time.]
39 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
BBC Pacific Quay
When MI5 raided the BBC
"When the Special Branch [of British intelligence agency MI5] raided the Scottish offices of the BBC over the Zircon Affair," The Observer reports, "it worked out a very simple selection process. Anything with the word 'secret' in it was promptly taken away for inspection. This included a tape of The Secret Servant, a spy thriller by Gavin Lyall." * The Zircon affair was an incident in 1986 and 1987 caused by the planned broadcast on the BBC of a television programme about the ultimately cancelled Zircon signals intelligence satellite, as part of the six-part Secret Society series. It raised many important issues in the British constitution, particularly concerning parliamentary privilege and "gagging orders."
31 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Mark Twain On James Fenimore Cooper's Fiction
Mark Twain was no fan of James Fenimore Cooper's fiction: "It is a restful chapter in any book of his," Twain once wrote, "when somebody doesn't step on a dry twig and alarm all the reds and whites for two hundred yards around. "Every time a Cooper person is in peril and absolute silence is worth four dollars a minute, he is sure to step on a dry twig. There may be a hundred handier things to step on, but that wouldn't satisfy Cooper. Cooper requires him to turn out and find a dry twig; and if he can't do it, go and borrow one." [It was once said of Cooper that he "came to the gates of immortality with ...
31 views
0 comments
0 points
0 favorites
Raymond Weaver - Which Books Interested You The Least?
Raymond Melbourne Weaver (1888–1948) was a Columbia University professor of English and comparative literature, and a literary scholar best known for publishing Herman Melville: Mariner and Mystic. When Weaver gave his first English literature students their first quiz, the brash young men whistled with joy at the sight of the question: "Which of the books read so far has interested you least?" Their hoots and hollers, however, were quickly silenced by the second question: "To what defect in yourself do you attribute this lack of interest?"