canada

#canada

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2830 Loyola Drive
Randy Bachman - Friendly Manitobans
While driving on a freeway near New Orleans one day, Randy Bachman and his Bachman-Turner Overdrive bandmates found themselves boxed in by three semi-trailer trucks, whose drivers deliberately slowed down to 30 mph. Occasionally, a gap would open up, and then quickly close as they tried to escape. Eventually, one of the trucks pulled off the road to get gas. The irate musicians followed and Bachman got out and confronted the driver. "We're just having some fun with you friendly Manitobans," the trucker said, alluding to the slogan [Friendly Manitoba] on their licence plates. Bachman said that their "game" was dangerous. "Hey," replied the trucker, "just let it ride..." [Bachman occasionally told this story as a lead-in to the classic ...
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A Newfoundland Poet Commissions A "Dock"
"The Newfoundland poet [E. J. Pran]... had a cottage near Bobcaygeon, Ontario, to which he would retreat each summer after classes ended at the University of Toronto, where he taught. Before closing up the place one season and returning to the city, he contracted with a local builder to make a private 'dock' on the property. He had used the term as it was used in Newfoundland, to mean a small enclosed dock, suitable for a child to swim in. When he returned the following summer, however, he found a 'dock' in the mainland Canadian sense: a pier or wharf 'big enough to moor a Kawartha Lakes steamer—and with a price to match.' Thus was it brought home once ...
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1496 Lower Water
Alexander Keith & The Halifax Riots
During the Halifax riots, a mob converged upon Alexander Keith's brewery in the Brewery Market in historic Halifax, Canada. His response? Keith generously opened the doors—and the taps -- and his brewery was the only establishment in the area which was not destroyed. * The company also survived the Halifax explosion of 1917, the largest non-nuclear explosion in history, and hosted a public celebration following World War II. Keith's Original Nova Scotia Brewery—established in 1820—is the oldest working brewery in North America.
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Peter Hays: "I was director of a small literary publishing company in Vancouver, British Columbia, called Talon Books. Each spring our cash flow dried up, as we waited for bookstores to pay for shipments of Christmas past and as our government subsidy grants were always in the proverbial mail. Each spring my partners and I had to go to our local branch of the Bank of Montreal and get a loan of $10,000 to tide us over. The company had been doing this for seven or eight years with clockwork regularity, taking as security a $10,000 savings bond deposited each time by one of my partners' mother."This particular spring in the late 1970s, our printing bills were heavier and our ...
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Laura Schlessinger - Can't I Own Canadians?
Shortly after the famously fundamentalist Laura Schlessinger attacked homosexuality on her syndicated radio show, a spoof letter began to circulate on the Internet: "Dear Dr. Laura, I have learned a great deal from your show... When someone tries to defend the homosexual lifestyle, for example, I simply remind him that Leviticus 18:22 clearly states it to be an abomination. End of debate. I do need some advice from you, however, regarding some of the other specific laws and how to follow them. "When I burn a bull on the altar as a sacrifice, I know it creates a pleasing odour for the Lord (Lev. 1:9). The problem is my neighbours. They claim the odour is not pleasing to them. ...
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When English Critic Roger Fry Wrote A Canadian's Obituary
The famed English art critic Roger Fry once penned a thoughtful obituary of Canadian Pacific Railway founder (and avid art collector) Sir William Van Horne in The Burlington Magazine. The gulf between North American and British usage had grown wider than Fry imagined, however, and he was soon obliged to apologize to Van Horne's family. Among other gaffes, Fry fondly recalled drinking beer with the great man in a "saloon"—which he incorrectly supposed to be an approximation to what the English called a "saloon bar"—a high class section of a regular pub.  Fry also apologized for calling the magnate's language "racy." "Here it is always used as praise," Fry remarked of England. "No one would suppose that it even denoted ...
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Charlotte Church: Being in America
During a concert in December 2002, Charlotte Church kindly told her audience that she loved being in America. When her comment was met with a stony silence, Church sang "The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)" and quickly left the stage. Some time later, she reappeared to make an announcement: "Someone told me backstage that we're in Canada... I'm sorry!" ["I do love Canada—Toronto's one of my favourite cities," she added. "I know you think I'm lying now—but I'm not." Among the nasty gibes in the Toronto press? "Back to geography class, girl" and "Surely chestnuts weren't the only thing being roasted!"]
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Norm Macdonald: Tight Security
While crossing the border into Canada one day Norm Macdonald was stopped for a routine search. "Any chance you're gonna search my ass?" he asked. When this question was met with an affirmative response, Macdonald had second thoughts. "I don't like Canada that much," he declared, and stayed in the United States. [Norm Macdonald was born in Canada.]
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How Mike Myers Discovered Jazz
Canada's "CanCon" law, passed in 1968 to boost musical content created or performed by Canadians, had many detractors, but it did help Canadian artists sell albums. Among the customers who endorsed the law was tweenaged future comedian Mike Myers, who frequented the (now defunct) flagship Toronto location of Sam the Record Man, which famously featured giant signs, shaped like vinyl records, whose neon lights flashed in sequence to give the illusion that they were spinning. "It was exciting," Myers later recalled. "There was a Canadian section in the store, and I often would buy albums sight unheard just to give them a chance because they were Canadian. One of those bands was the Stampeders, who ended up having a hit ...
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Calgary, Canada
Lionel Richie - eyeglasses
From People magazine: Pop singer Lionel Richie declared his endless love for the breathtaking Canadian countryside at his first concert in Calgary, Alberta [in 1984], near the Rocky Mountains. However, it took awhile for him to realize how much he liked it. He arrived wearing a pair of brand-new eyeglasses prescribed in L.A. Somehow the craggy, glacial majesty of Calgary's surrounding terrain was reduced to fuzziness. Just before the concert, Richie whipped off the glasses in frustration. "Suddenly I saw everything perfectly!" he told the audience. Now he calls the specs his smog-relief glasses because they only seem to work when there's soot in the air.