education

#education

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Official White House photo of President Bill Clinton, President of the United States. Credit: Bob McNeely, The White House[1] (Public domain)

Official White House photo of President Bill Clinton, President of the United States. Credit: Bob McNeely, The White House[1] (Public ...(more)

Bill Clinton: The biggest firestorm by far [early in his second term as Governor of Arkansas] was generated by the teacher-testing program. The Arkansas Education Association (AEA) went ballistic, accusing me of degrading teachers and using them as scapegoats. For the first time in my life, I was charged with racism, on the assumption that a higher percentage of black teachers would fail the test. Cynics accused Hillary and me of grandstanding to increase our popularity among people who would otherwise oppose any tax increase. While it was true that the teacher test was a strong sign of accountability to many people, the case for the test came out of the hearings the Standards Committee had held across the state. ...
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The Lost Village Schoolroom. Flickr photo by Donald Ogg (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)
The Lost Village Schoolroom. Flickr photo by Donald Ogg (CC BY-SA 2.0)
"Novelist and essayist George A. Birmingham was in his nonliterary life a clergyman in Ireland where he was pestered by bishops and other authorities to fill in recurring questionnaires," writes Patrick Ryan, in Smithsonian Magazine. "He took particular umbrage against the annual demand from the education office to report the dimensions of his village schoolroom. In the first and second years, he duly filled in the required figures. "The third year he replied that the schoolroom was still the same size. The education office badgered him with reminders until Birmingham finally filled in the figures. This time he doubled the dimensions of his schoolroom. "Nobody queried it. So he went on doubling the measurements until 'in the course of five ...
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114 Mt. Auburn
One day Harvard president Charles W. Eliot announced his plans to reduce support for the university's baseball team, notwithstanding its recent completion of a successful season. Pressed for an explanation, Eliot obliged: "This year I'm told the team did well because one pitcher had a fine curve ball," he said. "I understand that a curve ball is thrown with a deliberate attempt to deceive. Surely that is not an ability we should want to foster at Harvard."
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USC School of
Spielberg at Cinémathèque Française in 2012. Wikipedia photo from Romain DUBOIS (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>)
Spielberg at Cinémathèque Française in 2012. Wikipedia photo from Romain DUBOIS (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Thanks to lackluster grades in high school, Steven Spielberg was rejected from the University of Southern California three times. In 1994, he was awarded an honorary degree and became a university trustee in 1994. "Since 1980, I've been trying to be associated with this school," he joked. "I eventually had to buy my way in." In 2002, Spielberg returned to complete his work and earn a BA. "I wanted to accomplish this for many years," he remarked, "as a thank-you to my parents for giving me the opportunity for an education and a career," Spielberg said in a statement. "And as a personal note for my own family—and young people everywhere—about the importance of achieving their college education goals."
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Trump speaking at CPAC 2011. Flickr photo by Mark Taylor <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>(CC BY-SA 2.0)</a>
Trump speaking at CPAC 2011. Flickr photo by Mark Taylor (CC BY-SA 2.0)
In his later years, Donald Trump often boasted of attending the University of Pennsylvania's prestigious Wharton business school, to which he referred as "the best school in the world" and "super genius stuff." What Donald never told anyone was that the high SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) score which clinched his admission was not his. According to his niece, Mary L. Trump, when Donald was a high school student in Queens, New York, he paid someone to take the exam on his behalf.
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William Tyndale College
Nassau Hall in 2019. Flickr photo by Ken Lund (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)
Nassau Hall in 2019. Flickr photo by Ken Lund (CC BY-SA 2.0)
A 75-year-old college student named Michael Nicholson, who had spent 55 years in school and earned 30 degrees, wrote a piece for Vice magazine to share some advice. Among his nuggets of wisdom? Study something that interests you. "Otherwise, you'll probably drop it along the way." Don't fight with roommates. Even if you don't like them, they can teach you something. Listen. "It's amazing what you'll learn if you can keep your mouth shut." And, most importantly: "Stay in school. Stay in for as long as you can." Nicholson's degrees included two associate degrees, 23 master's degrees, three specialist degrees, a doctorate, and his first degree: a bachelor's degree in religious education from William Tyndale College in Detroit, Michigan.
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Los Angeles Central
BeckMSG190718-13. Credit: Raph_PH (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)
BeckMSG190718-13. Credit: Raph_PH (CC BY 2.0)
After Beck, who was a "bit of a target," stopped attending his Los Angeles high school, he applied to a performing arts school and was rejected. To get away from home, a tiny 350-square-foot apartment where he slept under the dining room table, Beck started taking the bus each day to the city's Central Library, where he found an entire room of musical scores. Soon he had taught himself how to read music, and began practicing on a piano in the foyer of his apartment building. Sadly, in 1986, when Beck was fifteen, the Central Library caught fire. But Beck was on his way. In 2019, he won his seventh Grammy.
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Mount St. Helens
Mount St. Helens, c. 18 May 1980. Lyn Topinka - CVO Photo Archive (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/>CC0</a>)
Mount St. Helens, c. 18 May 1980. Lyn Topinka - CVO Photo Archive (CC0)
Bill Bryson, in A Short History of Nearly Everything: Mount St. Helens started its ominous rumblings on 20 March [1980]. Within a week it was erupting magma, albeit in modest amounts, up to a hundred times a day, and being constantly shaken with earthquakes. People were evacuated to what was assumed to be a safe distance of 13 kilometres. ... On 19 April the northern flank of the mountain began to bulge conspicuously. Remarkably, no-one in a position of responsibility saw that this strongly signalled a lateral blast. The seismologists resolutely based their conclusions on the behaviour of Hawaiian volcanoes, which don't blow out sideways. Almost the only person who believed that something really bad might happen was Jack ...
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Tarantino in 2013. Photo: Georges Biard (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>)
Tarantino in 2013. Photo: Georges Biard (CC BY-SA 3.0)
"When people ask me if I went to film school," director Quentin Tarantino once remarked, "I tell them, 'No, I went to films.'"
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Celebration, FL
Downtown Celebration. Credit: JohnFota (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>)
Downtown Celebration. Credit: JohnFota (CC BY-SA 4.0)
From The Economist: Part of [the Disney-designed town of] Celebration's appeal was that it would offer a public school with a private education. "What was promised was a revolution in education," says Lawrence Haber, whose family was the first to move into Celebration, on June 18th 1996. Disney gathered experts from Harvard and Johns Hopkins universities, among others, to design the curriculum. There would be no grades. Classes would be mixed, with children of different age groups studying together. The result? It proved a disaster. Kids slacked off. Without test scores, parents were unable to track their children's progress. Arguments and fist-fights broke out between parents. The school eventually separated into two more conventional public schools. Mr Haber says he ...