entertainment

#entertainment

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A Twitter Account For Martin Scorsese's Eyebrows
Martin Scorsese's eyebrows, which GQ magazine once said "you could see from space," inspired a fan to start a Twitter account called Scorsese's Eyebrows (@Martys_Brows). "If you confuse us for Eugene Levy's eyebrows," says the bio, "we will pistol-whip the f— out of you like Liotta in Goodfellas. Fair warning." You talkin' to me? Well there's no one else here… — Scorsese's Eyebrows (@Martys_Brows) October 10, 2012
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How Franka Potente's Hair Stayed Red In Run Lola Run
Tom Tykwer's Run Lola Run (1998)—in which a girl runs around Berlin trying to find 100,000 deutschmarks to save her boyfriend's life—was a challenge for actress Franka Potente, who spent much of the seven-week shoot running in Doc Martens boots. Perhaps worse, to ensure that Potente's hair, which was dyed a distinct color of red, wouldn't fade, she wasn't able to wash it until the final day.
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Rudy Giuliani: 'Dyeing' Up There
During a press conference in November 2020, Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani alleged that the Democrats were stealing the 2020 U.S. presidential election. At one point, Giuliani said Republican poll watchers had been kept further from the counting than an errant witness in My Cousin Vinny was from the crime she claimed to have seen. "But this was the best part of the press conference," Jimmy Kimmel later recalled. "This press conference went on for an hour and 45 minutes, and during that time he got sweaty and his hair color started running down both sides of his head. This is real. we did not doctor this. He was literally 'dyeing' up there today."
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1515 Broadway, NYC
When Jon Cryer First Saw Pretty in Pink in a Theatre
When Pretty in Pink opened in 1986, Jon Cryer, who played Duckie Dale in the film, rented a limousine and hit various New York theaters to celebrate with some friends. Their most memorable stop was at the Loews Astor (now the Playstation Theater), where, Cryer recalls in his memoir, "years prior I'd sat in wonder at Star Wars, and my hoot-and-clap policy of acknowledging movie magic began. "We arrived after it had started, but I hightailed it to the front row and sat down just in time to catch 'Try a Little Tenderness' [his showstopping dance scene]. It was still a little surreal to see myself so uninhibited on-screen, but I was proud of it. When my dance was finished, ...
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When HBO Was Test-marketing Movies On Demand
Roger Ebert once marveled at "the time when HBO was first test-marketing movies on demand. There was much hilarity when it was learned that their Florida test market wasn't exactly a model of digital automation. Apparently actual employees were taking telephone orders and then scrambling around to push movies into playback machines on videocassettes, because DVDs hadn't been introduced." 
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When Jeff Maguire Sold a Script in the Nick of Time
Screenwriter Jeff Maguire wrote the script for In the Line of Fire (1993) in the early 1980s, more than a decade before it appeared in theaters, and his lack of success had left his family in a difficult financial situation. "With mounting credit card bills, overdue rent, and a phone that was about to be disconnected, Maguire and his wife were just getting ready to give up on Los Angeles and move toward a quieter life in New Hampshire when he got a call that Rob Reiner's Castle Rock Entertainment had purchased the script for a cool $1 million," writes Mental Floss's Jennifer Wood. "That day we traded in a blouse I got my wife for her birthday so we ...
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When Nicholas Kazan Was Surprised By His Own Brain
Screenwriter Nicholas Kazan once had a strange psychological experience. He realized that he had spent 90 minutes writing but had no idea what he had written. "I read somewhere," he later explained, "that the two brain hemispheres switch off their dominance every ninety minutes, and I believe that bursts of automatic writing are triggered when the left hemisphere sets up the writing problem and then, just at the point it's set up, the right hemisphere takes over."
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When Katy Waldman Asked The Twitterverse About Overuse Of The Word "Therapy"
While preparing a story titled "The Rise of Therapy-Speak" (about the popularization of what was once a clinical term) in 2021, The New Yorker's Katy Waldman asked the Twitterverse whether the word's "mainstreaming" was productive. "I was struck by two replies," she later recalled. "First, overapplying the term might dilute its meaning, robbing 'people who have experienced legitimate trauma of language that is already oftentimes too thin.' And, second, invoking 'trauma' where 'harm' might suffice could play into the hands of 'people who despise and fear vulnerability.' "During this exchange, Twitter served me an advertisement that urged me to 'understand my trauma' by purchasing a yoga membership." [Waldman found the incident ridiculous. "I'm not a sexual-assault survivor. I've never been ...
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Philadelphians Dance In The Streets In November 2020
Though president Donald Trump was leading by nearly a million votes in Pennsylvania on the eve of Election Day in 2020, with two million votes—including many from left-leaning Philadelphia—still to be counted, pundits predicted that the state—and thus the election—would eventually be called for Democrat Joe Biden. When Biden pulled ahead three days later, many Philadelphians literally danced in the streets… West Philly reacts to Biden's lead in Pennsylvania by dancing in the street, of course pic.twitter.com/WBuipfLydN — Ellie Rushing (@EllieRushing) November 6, 2020
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Freedom Square in
The attempted assassination of George W. Bush
In May 2005, President George W. Bush gave a speech in Freedom Square in Tbilisi, Georgia. Among the people in the crowd was a local man named Vladimir Arutyunian. According to Wikipedia: Arutyunian waited for the United States President George W. Bush and Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili to speak in Tbilisi's central Liberty Square. When Bush began speaking, Arutyunian threw a Soviet-made RGD-5 hand grenade, wrapped in a red tartan handkerchief, toward the podium where Bush stood as he addressed the crowd. The grenade landed 18.6 metres (61 ft) from the podium, near where Saakashvili, his wife Sandra E. Roelofs, Laura Bush, and other officials were seated. The grenade failed to detonate. Although original reports indicated that the grenade was ...