faces

#faces

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Why Director Franco Zeffirelli Didn't Cast Kevin Bacon
"My agent called me up—I was up for a movie with Franco Zeffirelli directing," Kevin Bacon once recalled. "'You didn't get it.' 'Really?' 'Yeah, you got really really close.' 'Okay. Oh well, shit.' Hung up the phone. I called him back: 'Can you tell me why? I really felt good about the audition.' 'Franco didn't like your nose.'"Franco Zeffirelli in Moscow. Wikipedia photo by Alexey Yushenkov (CC BY-SA 3.0)
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White House
Donald Trump & President Mozzarella
Speaking about America's relations with Italy in October 2019, U.S. President Donald Trump made a host of errors, which left the White House's Italian translator looking utterly bewildered. Among other gaffes, Trump called Italian head of state Sergio Mattarella "President Mozzarella" and claimed that America and Italy had been allies since Ancient Rome. The look of the White House Italian translator as Trump says President Mozzarella for the Italian President and says U.S. and Italy have been allies since Ancient Rome. pic.twitter.com/4c4kTl1wl3— Teymour (@Teymour_Ashkan) October 17, 2019
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Donald Trump: Haven't Touched My Face In Weeks
Meeting with airline CEOs about the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis on March 4, 2020, Donald Trump boasted, "I haven't touched my face in weeks. I miss it." Twitter was promptly swamped with recent photos of the president with his hands all over his face. [Trump's claim was likely less a lie than a case of forgetfulness. In Jennifer Ackerman's book, "Ah-Choo!: The Uncommon Life of Your Common Cold," cold expert Dr. Jack Gwaltney confessed that, despite his own best efforts, he routinely caught colds like everyone else; it is nigh impossible, he said, for humans to avoid touching their faces, and even harder when we are sleeping.]
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Professional hunter Alexei Pitka shoots an angry grizzly bear
Bill Bryson: [In Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance, Canadian academic Stephen Herrero] recounts an incident that nicely conveys the near indestructibility of the grizzly. It concerns a professional hunter in Alaska named Alexei Pitka, who stalked a large male through snow and finally felled it with a well-aimed shot to the heart from a large-bore rifle. Pitka should probably have carried a card with him that said: "First make sure bear is dead. Then put gun down." He advanced cautiously and spent a minute or two watching the bear for movement, but when there was none he set the gun against a tree (big mistake!) and strode forward to claim his prize. Just as he reached it, the bear ...
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When Paul Ekman Realized That The Face Is A Gold Mine Of Information
A watershed in famed lie detector Paul Ekman's career came one day in the late 1960s. "Ekman," Malcolm Gladwell writes, "had just tracked down a hundred thousand feet of film that had been shot by the virologist Carleton Gajdusek in the remote jungles of Papua New Guinea. "Some of the footage was of a tribe called the South Fore, who were a peaceful and friendly people. The rest was of the Kukukuku, who were hostile and murderous and who had a homosexual ritual where pre-adolescent boys were required to serve as courtesans for the male elders of the tribe. "Ekman was still working on the problem of whether human facial expressions were universal, and the Gajdusek film was invaluable. ...
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Shaw on a Pedestal
"On the day in 1939 that George Bernard Shaw finished writing Good King Charles's Golden Days," Sir Alec Guinness later recalled, "I was invited to lunch. In the drawing room Mrs Shaw gathered guests at a bronze bust of Shaw, standing on a pedestal, while we had coffee. 'This side,' she said 'shows Shaw the philosopher. Now come round here.' We shifted a few paces and were joined by the great man, who stood listening, smiling and approving. 'From this angle,' Mrs Shaw explained, 'you see Bernard the humorist. You will notice the mouth turns up at the corner; while from this side -' we all shuffled hack to our first position '- the corner of the mouth turns down. ...
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Mystery of the Universe?
"There is a wonderful photograph of Albert Einstein [taken in 1953] by Ernst Haas which shows him rubbing his chin in a pensive mood, apparently contemplating the mystery of the universe. In fact the picture was taken immediately after Haas had asked Einstein where he had shelved a particular book."
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La Spezia, Italy
The Haunting Of Percy Bysshe Shelley
In July 1822, less than a month before his 30th birthday, Percy Bysshe Shelley drowned in a sudden storm on the Gulf of La Spezia while returning from Leghorn (Livorno) to Lerici in his sailing boat, the Don Juan. "That same night," according to author Lynn Shepherd, "his friend Lady Mountcashell dreamt of him, his face pale and melancholy, saying mournfully, 'I shall never eat more'. She had no idea then, that he was dead. It was 10 days before the bodies were found, flung onto the beach near Viareggio. By then Shelley was only identifiable by the clothes he wore, and the book he still carried in his pocket. His face and hands had been completely eaten away."
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How F1 Driver Juan Manuel Fangio Avoided A Deadly Crash
Argentine Formula One driver Juan Manuel Fangio, who won the World Drivers' Championship five times, was clearly a quick thinker. On one occasion, in the lead after the opening lap of the 1950 Monaco Grand Prix, Fangio was approaching a particularly dangerous bend when he suddenly realized that something was wrong. The faces of the spectators, which he usually perceived as a whitish blur, were turned away from him.  "If they are not looking at me," Fangio inferred, "they must be looking at something more interesting around the corner." He hit the brakes and as he came around the bend, he saw that his assessment had been correct. The track was blocked by a massive pileup.  Thanks to waves crashing over the harbor ...
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Josef Von Sternberg's Thought-Provoking Acting Tip For Marlene Dietrich
The famed caricaturist Al Hirschfeld and his wife (the actress Dolly Haas) once accompanied Marlene Dietrich to see Morocco (1930) at the Museum of Modem Art. Enthralled by Dietrich's performance, Hirschfeld asked her, "Marlene, how did you get that wonderful expression at the end when you kick your shoes off and make your way into the desert to follow Gary Cooper?" "I did what Joe von Sternberg asked me to," she modestly replied. "I counted from twenty-five backwards!"