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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

From the New York Times: Contrary to Lance Armstrong's repeated claim that he never tested positive, it was widely reported at the time that he tested positive for a corticosteroid during the 1999 Tour. But he was not sanctioned because the team produced a prescription from one of its doctors indicating that Armstrong had received it in a cream used to treat a saddle sore. * The United States Anti-Doping Agency later contended in a report that the prescription and its explanation were both shams. In his affidavit to Usada, Tyler Hamilton, the disgraced former Olympic champion and Armstrong teammate, said the positive test prompted "a great deal of swearing from Lance and Johan." A backdated prescription, a former team ...
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Even as a child, Lance Armstrong was bent upon testing the boundaries. "When I was a boy I invented a game called fireball," he recalled in his autobiography. Fireball? Yes... The game "entailed soaking a tennis ball in kerosene, lighting it on fire, and playing catch with it." ["I have loved him every minute of his life," his mother once declared, "but, God, there were times when it was a struggle."]
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Lance Armstrong was a scrappy young man. One day his mother told him that he had been banned from riding the bus for fighting in the bus line. His reply? "That's okay. I can ride my bike."
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

On August 31, 2005, while vacationing in Sun Valley, Idaho, Lance Armstrong rowed then-girlfriend Sheryl Crow out onto a lake in a little fishing boat. As they coasted along the water, the motor ran out of gas. Lance, who had been planning a proposal, sensed that the moment was picture perfect and impulsively popped the question. Only one thing was missing. "I felt bad," he later explained. "I didn't have the ring with me!"  Crow thought the proposal was "was very romantic" and said yes. Sadly, their five month engagement ended in February 2006 when they called off their wedding. 
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Michael Specter: [Lance Armstrong] not only rode—he won. Again and again and again. Each victory seemingly more thrilling than the last. Seven Tours in all; a feat unmatched in sports. Cycling had long been tainted by the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs, and Armstrong's achievement was so astounding that many people simply assumed he relied on them just as others had. The French were the loudest and most persistent critics (reason alone, in my book, to feel for the man). But others wondered, too. As I wrote in my lengthy and adulatory Profile of Armstrong, Greg LeMond, America's first Tour de France champion (he won three times), put it well, if somewhat uncharitably, after Armstrong won his third straight Tour, in ...
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Despite Lance Armstrong's repeated claims that he never tested positive for steroids or doping, it was widely reported at the time that he had tested positive for a corticosteroid during the 1999 Tour de France. He was not sanctioned, according to The New York Times, "because the team produced a prescription from one of its doctors indicating that Armstrong had received it in a cream used to treat a saddle sore."  * The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) later claimed that the prescription and its explanation were both shams. In his affidavit to the USADA, Tyler Hamilton, the disgraced former Olympic champion and Armstrong teammate, said the positive test prompted "a great deal of swearing from Lance and Johan." A backdated prescription, a ...
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Sheryl Crow at the USC's Changing Lives and Creating Cures Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on November 20, 2014. Credit: Mingle Media TV (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)

Sheryl Crow at the USC's Changing Lives and Creating Cures Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on November 20, 2014. ...(more)

One day Lance Armstrong gave Sheryl Crow a nice surprise. "He rowed me out into the middle of a lake in the mountains and asked me to get married," she recalled. "It was very romantic."
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Following Lance Armstrong's doping confession to Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, a notice appeared in Manly Library, near Sydney, Australia, informing readers that all books about the American cyclist would soon be recategorized and moved. "All non-fiction Lance Armstrong titles, including Lance Armstrong: Images of a Champion, The Lance Armstrong Performance Program and Lance Armstrong: World's Greatest Champion," the sign read, "will soon be moved to the fiction section." [Sadly, a council spokesperson later announced that the sign was a prank and libraries cannot reclassify books. Meanwhile, Armstrong's autobiography, It's Not About The Bike, was the target of many nasty reviews on Amazon.com: "It is now clear that most everything Armstrong says is a lie," wrote online reviewer Jesper. "Most ...
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

Michael Specter, in The New Yorker: Lance Armstrong not only rode—he won. Again and again and again. Each victory seemingly more thrilling than the last. Seven Tours in all; a feat unmatched in sports. Cycling had long been tainted by the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs, and Armstrong's achievement was so astounding that many people simply assumed he relied on them just as others had. The French were the loudest and most persistent critics (reason alone, in my book, to feel for the man). But others wondered, too. As I wrote in my lengthy and adulatory Profile of Armstrong, Greg LeMond, America's first Tour de France champion (he won three times), put it well, if somewhat uncharitably, after Armstrong won his ...
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Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South Australia. www.tourdownunder.com.au/2009/ The press conference started out with talk of doping and testing, I felt bad for Lance and Johan that those were the first questions. Although both seemed relaxed and without expectations, they claimed that Armstrong was in better shape for this time of year than in a normal year due to a longer preparation for the season, this time starting in July rather than the usual December. He said that he still had some weight to lose and as a result he estimated that his current time-trial form would be better than climbing. The impression was that he had no great expectations for the Tour Down Under but stated that if opportunities arose that he would take them. Credit: Paul Coster (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

Lance Armstrong and Astana general manager Johan Bruyneel in press conference for the 2009 Tour Down Under in Adelaide South ...(more)

"Cycling is so hard, the suffering is so intense, that it's absolutely cleansing," Lance Armstrong wrote in his autobiography (It's Not About the Bike). "The pain is so deep and strong that a curtain descends over your brain... Once, someone asked me what pleasure I took in riding for so long. 'Pleasure?' I said. 'I don't understand the question.' I didn't do it for pleasure. I did it for pain." [Armstrong's oncologist, Craig Nichols (who treated his cancer) described Armstrong as the "most willful person I have ever met... He wasn't willing to die." When the cancer spread to Armstrong's lungs, abdomen, and brain, he underwent four rounds of chemotherapy so powerful that the chemicals destroyed his musculature, caused permanent ...