law

#law

202 posts
0 followers
25 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Did Ivanka Trump Break The Hatch Act?
In June 2019, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) claimed that Ivanka Trump had broken a law barring government officials from engaging in partisan politics:Assistant to the President Ivanka Trump appears to have violated the Hatch Act by engaging in both official government business and political activity using her Twitter account @IvankaTrump, according to a complaint filed today by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) with the Office of Special Counsel (OSC). Trump's apparent violation occurred only three days after the OSC recommended that her colleague, Kellyanne Conway, be fired for her repeated Hatch Act violations and public disdain for ethics laws. Trump likely violated the Hatch Act when she used her @IvankaTrump Twitter account to ...
33 views
1 point
0 comments
0 favorites
United States Ex Rel. Gerald Mayo V. Satan And His Staff
From Wikipedia: United States ex rel. Gerald Mayo v. Satan and His Staff, 54 F.R.D. 282 (W.D.Pa. 1971), was a federal court case in which a prisoner filed a lawsuit against Satan and his servants in United States District Court. It was dismissed on procedural grounds. Although all inmates are protected by the Eighth Amendment from cruel and unusual punishment, the definition of cruel and unusual punishment is not clear. Courts have held that a violation of a person's dignity could be considered cruel and unusual, and that prisoners are entitled to medical care and treatment. The complaint Gerald Mayo, a 22 year old inmate at Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh [since closed], filed a claim before the United States District ...
39 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Theodore Roosevelt & the Panama Canal
In 1903, the United States took possession of the Panama Canal Zone. Theodore Roosevelt, concerned about the questionable nature of the acquisition, asked Attorney General Philander Knox to search for a legal justification for the takeover. "Mr. President," Knox answered, "do not let so great an achievement suffer from any taint of legality." ["A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car," Roosevelt remarked on another occasion, "but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad."] [More than 25,000 people lost their lives during the construction of the Panama Canal.]
17 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Supreme Court overturns segregationist ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson
"On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court announced its decision in the case of Brown v. Board of Education. 'Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal,' the Court ruled unanimously, declaring that they violated the equal-protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. It thus overturned the doctrine of 'separate but equal,' which had been the law of the land since 1896, when Plessy v. Ferguson was decided..."Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson, a Truman appointee from Kentucky, argued that Plessy should be permitted to stand. 'Congress has not declared there should be no segregation,' Vinson observed, and surely, he went on, the Court must be responsive to 'the long-continued interpretation of Congress ever since the Amendments.' Justice Stanley F. Reed, also a Kentuckian, ...
14 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Keats = Moron?
In August 2002, conceptual artist Jonathon Keats began collecting signatures on a petition to have the city of Berkeley, California (his hometown) legally enforce "Aristotle's Law" stipulating that every entity is equal to itself: A = A. Though the law (by definition) cannot possibly be broken, Keats's proposed legislation would have required that a misdemeanour fine (of up to 0.1 cents) be imposed on anyone (or anything) caught being unidentical to itself within city limits.
16 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Francois Quesnay - who would govern?
Louis XV once asked Francois Quesnay (his former physician) what he would do if he were king. "Nothing," Quesnay replied. "But then, who would govern?" Louis asked. Replied Quesnay: "The laws."
15 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Felonious Interpretation
The publication of Sir John Hayward's History of Henry IV (1599) landed its author in dire straits with Queen Elizabeth, who believed that under the guise of writing history he had deigned to criticize her rule. She therefore asked Francis Bacon whether Hayward might be prosecuted for treason. "I cannot answer for there being treason in it," Bacon advised, "but certainly it contains much felony." "How?" the queen asked. "And wherein?" "In many passages," Bacon replied, "which he has stolen from Tacitus."
36 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
All Foreign Fruit-plants Free From Duty
In the eighteen-nineties a new law was passed in America decreeing that all foreign fruit-plants would be free from duty. Unfortunately, the congressional clerk assigned the task of transcribing the law mistook the hyphen for a comma and wrote: "All foreign fruit, plants are free from duty." By the time Congress passed a law correcting the error, the federal government had lost more than $2 million in taxes.
227 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Eleanor Of Aquitaine - By The Wrath Of God
At age 15, Eleanor of Aquitaine married Louis VII, King of France. Her subsequent petition for divorce from Louis was based on the claim that they were too closely related for the marriage to have been legal in the eyes of God (and the church). In 1154, just two years after the marriage was annulled, Eleanor married Henry II of England. "I am Queen of England," she drily remarked, "by the wrath of God." [At age 19, she knelt in the cathedral of Vezelay (before the celebrated Abbe Bernard of Clairvaux) and offered him thousands of her vassals for the Second Crusade. Dressed like an Amazon, Eleanor galloped through the crowds on a white horse, urging them to join the ...
21 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Bill Gates - Bored Stiff?
On paper at least, the Microsoft trial (for antitrust violations) had all the makings of a terrific courtroom drama: on the cusp of a historic economic boom, the world's largest company, run by the world's richest man (the secretive and controversial Bill Gates), was being sued by the world's most powerful government. While many observers expected an edge-of-the-seat epic, the trial was remembered more for its grinding legal arguments—over consent decrees, application-programme interfaces and middleware—than for sudden courtroom twists, smoking guns (or e-mails) and high-level corporate betrayals. Indeed, one salient fact serves to underline just how dull the trial really was: on several occasions, Thomas Penfield Jackson, the presiding judge in the case, fell asleep!