money

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Andy Warhol Elvis Presley - 42" X 30" poster
Andy Warhol Elvis Presley - 42" X 30" poster
Bob Dylan once traded a $750,000 Andy Warhol painting for a couch. It was, he said, "a stupid thing to do." "Among the superstars invited to be one of Warhol's screen test subjects was none other than Dylan," says cheatsheet.com's Britney Yates. "According to Fred Bals, he was invited by filmmaker Barbara Rubin to do 'two-minute silent movie portraits starring Factory regulars and outside celebrities.' The accounts of the meeting are unclear, but it is said to have been in either 1965 or 1966. "Nonetheless, Dylan is said to have 'sat sullenly staring into the camera for a few minutes and then was either given or appropriated (depending on the teller) a Warhol silkscreen of two overlapping images of ...
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Deutsch: Bill Gates während der Münchner Sicherheitskonferenz 2017. Credit: Kuhlmann /MSC (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>)
Deutsch: Bill Gates während der Münchner Sicherheitskonferenz 2017. Credit: Kuhlmann /MSC (CC BY 3.0)
William H. Gates III had business on his mind from the very beginning. One day when he was ten years old, Gates drew up a contract—giving him unlimited access to his older sister's baseball mitt.
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A portrait of the American writer Mark Twain taken by A. F. Bradley in New York, 1907.[1][2][3]. Credit: A.F. Bradley, New York (Public domain)

A portrait of the American writer Mark Twain taken by A. F. Bradley in New York, 1907.[1][2][3]. Credit: A.F. Bradley, ...(more)

Mark Twain once attended a meeting at which one of the speakers was raising money. Twain, deeming the cause a worthy one, decided to donate $40. As the speaker droned on, however, he decided to cut his contribution in half. With no end in sight, Twain cut his intended offer again, to $10. Eventually, a collection basket was passed around. When it finally reached him, Twain removed a dollar and passed it along.
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The Westin St.
A Race at Bay Meadows in 2008. Wikipedia photo by Seeyardee (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/>CC0</a>)
A Race at Bay Meadows in 2008. Wikipedia photo by Seeyardee (CC0)
Nevada State Senator Zeb Kendall was a fixture at California race tracks and was highly respected for his knowledge of horse racing. After visiting the Bay Meadows Race Track one day, he returned to his apartment at San Francisco's St. Francis Hotel. As he was late for dinner, to placate his angry wife, Kendall opened his bag and displayed $80,000 worth of gold and bank notes which he had won that afternoon. Mrs. Kendall response was not what he expected. She grabbed Kendall's bag, went to an open window, and emptied its contents into the street below. [The hotel attendants recovered most of the money.]
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Hill circa 1856 (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/>CC0</a>)
Hill circa 1856 (CC0)
In his diary, Rene Gimpel, a French art dealer who helped many robber barons to build their collections, recalled a story about the notorious tight-wad James J. Hill, one of the original directors of the Canadian Pacific Railway. "He was a dock worker somewhere in Canada, and used to have lunch and dinner at a restaurant with about twenty-five other dock workers, all thrifty and all sparing in their tips to the waitress; but on Christmas Eve, Hill got up and asked them all if they were prepared to give the girl the same sum as he. They said yes, particularly as they knew Hill was even stingier than they. He put $20 on the table. They were horrified, ...
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In July 2003, Portland Trail Blazers star Damon "Mighty Mouse" Stoudamire was arrested with almost 43 grams of marijuana in his possession. How was Stoudamire's stash discovered? He set off an airport metal detector after walking through—with his weed wrapped in tin foil. Stoudamire, who had been arrested twice before for drug-related incidents, was suspended and fined $250,000 by the National Basketball Association.
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A classic smiley face. Credit: Wikipedia user Mystìc (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)
A classic smiley face. Credit: Wikipedia user Mystìc (CC BY-SA 2.0)
In 1963,  an insurance firm hired graphic artist Harvey Ball to develop an image that would help to improve morale. In about ten minutes, he came up with a yellow circle with dots for eyes and a big curvy grin. By the early 70’s the "smiley face" was everywhere - on bumper stickers, coffee mugs, and boxer shorts. It became a symbol of the "Me Decade," even appearing on a postage stamp.  Amazingly, Ball sold the image for $45 and never tried to copyright it, foregoing millions in potential royalties. More amazing still, that never seemed to bother him. "Hey," he said on one occasion, "I can only eat one steak at a time."  * Contrary to popular belief, Ball did not invent ...
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Dennis Tito, the first private citizen to visit the International Space Station, at the 40th Space Congress in 2003 (NASA photo)

Dennis Tito, the first private citizen to visit the International Space Station, at the 40th Space Congress in 2003 (NASA ...(more)

In May 2001, through an arrangement with space tourism company Space Adventures, Ltd, the California investment banker Dennis Tito publicly squandered $20 million on the "vacation of a lifetime": a trip to the international space station (ISS) aboard the dodgy Russian spacecraft MIR. Enjoying what the New York Times called "the most offensively elitist form of eco-tourism yet devised by earthlings," Tito spent most of his travel time taking pictures and looking out the window of the Russian module, because he was absolutely banned from going anywhere else. Tito did manage to spend some quality time engaged in other popular zero-G activities however: "I think the throwing up lasted only two hours," his son later explained. "It's really a piece of ...
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Photograph of author Erle Stanley Gardner. Credit: John Atherton (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)
Photograph of author Erle Stanley Gardner. Credit: John Atherton (CC BY-SA 2.0)
Early in his career, mystery writer Erle Stanley Gardner earned a living churning out stories for pulp magazines at the incredible rate of 200,000 words per month. As he was paid by the word, the length of a story was of no small importance. Noting that his villains were invariably killed by the last bullet in the chamber, Gardner's editor once asked why his heroes were so careless with the first five shots. "At three cents a word," Gardner replied, "every time I say 'Bang' in the story I get three cents. If you think I'm going to finish the gun battle while my hero has got fifteen cents' worth of unexploded ammunition in his gun, you're nuts!"
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According to Ben Wicks' Book of Losers, a wild party erupted in an exclusive Dallas restaurant one evening when Pakistani businessman F. Mahsood Khon gave his waitress a million dollar tip. Not until the party was over did the restaurant learn that Khon had contacted the First National Bank in Washington to put a stop payment on the check.