movies

#movies

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Chevy Chase - Nearly Electrocuted
In 1981, Chevy Chase was nearly electrocuted on a film set when the "landing lights" which his character was wearing (while imagining himself as an airplane) short-circuited, sending an electric current through his arm, back, and neck. The film's title? Modern Problems.[Chase's brush with death was followed by a period of deep depression.]
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3 Cheers for DiMaggio
Shortly after her marriage to Joe DiMaggio (in January, 1946), Marilyn Monroe interrupted their honeymoon (with his blessing) to tour American troop installations abroad. "Oh, Joe!" she exclaimed upon her triumphant return. "It was so exciting. The boys were thrilled! You never heard such cheers!" DiMaggio's reply? "Yes, I have."[Notwithstanding this remark, DiMaggio was usually remarkably elegant and reserved. DiMaggio and Monroe were divorced the following year.][In the 1939 All-Star game, DiMaggio—playing for the American League—hit an inconspicuous-looking home run. The homer proved to be more significant four years later, however, when his brother Vince—playing for the National League in the 1943 All-Star game—also hit a boomer, sending both brothers into the record books: As the only siblings ever to ...
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Jazz Singer Al Jolson - You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet
At one point during the filming of The Jazz Singer, Al Jolson called out to the technicians and extras on the set, "Wait a minute! Wait a minute! You ain't heard nothin' yet!" His unscripted words, due to be cut from the sound track, were left in at the last minute and soon became part of cinematic history.[A 1969 BBC telecast of The Jazz Singer was stopped for ten minutes while executives decided whether or not to continue. If Jolson's classic line ("You ain't heard nothing yet") was deemed to constitute an ad for his music, airing it would contravene the BBC's policy not to screen films in which products were advertised. (Karnataka Quiz Association)]
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Andy Tennant: Trouble With Anna And The King
Director Andy Tennant anticipated having difficulty obtaining permission to film Anna and the King (which depicts the classic encounter between a starchy British governess and the monarch of Siam) in Thailand (formerly Siam). So much had Thai film authorities hated The King and I that Twentieth Century Fox had been banned from filming in Thailand for 44 years. Hoping to win approval from the Thai film board, Tennant went through five rewrites to address a long list of objections, among them a scene in which the king's daughter climbs a tree and drops fruit on his head; scenes in which Anna's son, Louis, makes fun of the way the king walks and talks; and various comments about the king's concubines ...
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Josh Lucas - voice coach
"I worked with a voice coach for years to take certain sounds out of my accent," Josh Lucas recalled. "Oddly enough, that was the same woman they hired for Sweet Home Alabama [2002] to do dialect coaching: 'O.K., now, that sound we got rid of, let's bring it back!'"
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Kenneth Branagh - first day on the set
In 1989, Kenneth Branagh directed and starred in his first major film, Henry V. Branagh, whose youth and rapid ascent to prominence suggested parallels with Henry, was well suited to assuming the lead role. As a director, however, he was a fish out of water. On his first day on the set, the young director forgot that he had to shout "action" to get things rolling. He was quietly reminded—by someone poking him in the ribs.[In fact, Branagh proved to be an excellent director, completing the shoot ahead of schedule and under budget. The film earned him Best Actor and Best Director Oscar nominations.]
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Katharine Hepburn & John Barrymore: Bill of Divorcement
During the production of A Bill of Divorcement, Katharine Hepburn frequently quarreled with John Barrymore. When filming wrapped, she turned to her co-star and screamed, "Thank God I don't have to act with you anymore!" "I wasn't aware," Barrymore tartly replied, "that you ever had, darling."
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Von Stoheim - army-issue underwear
Erich von Stroheim's films are noted for the richness of their characterization and detail. Indeed, the director lavished such attention on sets, costumes, props, and makeup that he constantly found himself battling with the studio's management (at Universal) over cost overruns on his pictures.According to one well-known story, during the production of a certain war film, von Stroheim ordered the embroidery of authentic army-issue underwear for his extras to wear—on the grounds that only then would they know 'exactly' how their real-life counterparts had felt.
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Woody Allen - Saved by the Bell
According to Kenneth Branagh, whenever anyone was annoying Woody Allen on the set, he would use "a little secret gesture" (scratching his ear) to signal one of his assistants. "Mr. Allen," the assistant would say, appearing with a telephone, "a call for you."[Branagh did not disclose whether Woody had ever used the gesture while conversing with him.]
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Robert Benchley - hard work pays off?
A scene in one of Robert Benchley's movie shorts called for the writer to be strung up in a jumble of telephone wires high above a city street. While waiting for the final camera, Benchley suddenly turned to his wife, Gertrude. "Remember how good at Latin I was in school?" he reflected. "Well, look where it got me!"