patriotism

#patriotism

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Français : Georges Clemenceau par Nadar. Credit: Paul Nadar (Public domain)
Français : Georges Clemenceau par Nadar. Credit: Paul Nadar (Public domain)
While traveling to a meeting with Colonel House (British prime pinister Harold Wilson's adviser) one day during the Versailles conference following World War I, French prime minister Georges Clemenceau's car was fired upon by a young anarchist named Emile Cottin. As the car raced off, Cottin fired the last of his seven shots, one of which hit Clemenceau near the heart. When Cottin was apprehended and the death penalty demanded, however, Clemenceau intervened. "We have just won the most terrible war in history, yet here is a Frenchman who misses his target six times out of seven," Clemenceau complained. "Of course the fellow must be punished for the careless use of a dangerous weapon." Clemenceau's recommendation? Eight years in ...
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The Great Wall of China at Jinshanling, photo: Severin.stalder <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>(CC BY-SA 3.0)</a>
The Great Wall of China at Jinshanling, photo: Severin.stalder (CC BY-SA 3.0)
"China's leaders," The Economist reported in March 2020, "have joined the long list of governments humbled by a populist revolt over immigration—though there are hardly any immigrants in China, and political opposition is banned. The revolt's cause is also a surprise: a consultation exercise by the justice ministry, inviting comments on a proposal to make it slightly easier for rich or highly skilled foreigners to become permanent residents. "On March 7th, after days of online fury, officials took the proposal back for revisions. Soon afterwards censors moved to shut down the debate. By then a related hashtag on Weibo, a Twitter-like service, had been viewed more than 5bn times. A dismaying number of comments betrayed racial and sexual panic, with ...
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London, England
. Credit: Nicolas de Largillière (Public domain)
. Credit: Nicolas de Largillière (Public domain)
The free-thinking Voltaire frequently found himself in trouble with the French authorities. After a brief imprisonment, he fled to London. His exile (between 1726 and 1729) came at a time, however, when popular animosity toward the French was at its height. One day, the philosopher was surrounded in the street by an angry mob. "Hang him!" they shouted. "Hang the Frenchman!" Voltaire calmly turned to face the madding crowd: "Men of England!" he called. "You wish to kill me because I am a Frenchman? Am I not punished enough in not having been born an Englishman?" So pleased were his captors with Voltaire's address that he was loudly applauded and escorted back to his lodgings. "My prayer to God ...
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In 2014, Gu Junshan, a lieutenant general in the People's Liberation Army (PLA) of China, was sent to prison for corruption, bribery, embezzlement and abuse of power. Though police removed four truckloads of wine, art, cash, and other valuables from his family's homes, Gu was slow to admit his guilt. Asked about a solid gold replica of China's first aircraft carrier, Gu reportedly said that he only kept it to display his patriotism. [According to Wikipedia: In March 2014, state media publicly announced Gu's corruption investigation. Gu was charged with corruption, bribery, embezzlement and abuse of power by the PLA Military Procuratorate. His case was then moved to court martial. Gu was the highest-ranked military official to be charged with ...
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From The Economist: To say another country is copying homework is to be patriotic, but with snark. When another country copies China's homework, users mean that it's deploying tactics pioneered by China, without giving credit. This sentiment was particularly prevalent among Chinese Weibo users when Donald Trump labelled covid-19 the "Chinese virus," drawing attention – and blame – to the global pandemic's source. As the virus spreads in the West, many commenters on Weibo have called the health crisis facing America an "open-book exam". As ever, China is keen to be top of the class.
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Grigori Rasputin (1864-1916). Credit: Unknown author (Public domain)
Grigori Rasputin (1864-1916). Credit: Unknown author (Public domain)
"Russia's first museum of erotica is to open in St Petersburg—with Rasputin's penis reputedly among the exhibits," ananova reported in May 2004. "Museum founder Igor Knyazkin says the 12-inch organ will be the star attraction. Mr Knyazkin, who is also the chief of the prostate research centre of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, said he was particularly proud of the pickled penis. He said: 'Having this exhibit, we can stop envying America, where Napoleon Bonaparte's penis is now kept. Napoleon's penis is but a small pod—it cannot stand comparison to our organ of 30 centimetres.'" Some time later, it was reported that visitors were rubbing their hands over the jar in which the penis was contained in the belief ...
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Adlai Stevenson (White House photo)
Adlai Stevenson (White House photo)
As President-elect, John F. Kennedy named four of Adlai Stevenson's law partners to key government positions. "I only regret," Stevenson drily remarked, "that I have but one law firm to lose for my country." [A reference of course to Nathan Hale's defiant remark: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."]
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スター・ウォーズ/最後のジェダイ ジャパン・プレミア レッドカーペット アダム・ドライバー. Credit: Dick Thomas Johnson from Tokyo, Japan (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)
スター・ウォーズ/最後のジェダイ ジャパン・プレミア レッドカーペット アダム・ドライバー. Credit: Dick Thomas Johnson from Tokyo, Japan (CC BY 2.0)
After a rejection from Juilliard, Adam Driver struggled as an aspiring actor until 9/11, when he had an epiphany. "I was having an argument with my stepfather," he later recalled, "and he was like, 'Why don't you join the Marine Corps?' And I was like, 'Noooo! Well, maybe, actually ...' I went and saw the recruiter, who was like, 'Are you on the run from the cops? Because we've never had someone want to leave so fast.'" Driver was also keen to leave the army. "I was like, 'I'm going to smoke cigarettes and be an actor when I get out.' Those were my two thoughts. I wanted to smoke cigarettes and be an actor."
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Français : Mel Gibson au festival de Cannes. Credit: Georges Biard (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0">CC BY-SA 3.0</a>)
Français : Mel Gibson au festival de Cannes. Credit: Georges Biard (CC BY-SA 3.0)
In 1996, Vanity Fair contributing editor Toby Young attended the magazine's Oscar party on the condition that he not speak to any celebrities. Young later recalled: I was standing by the bar, feeling thoroughly dejected [after an incident with Jim Carrey], when Mel Gibson walked in. He was clutching the two Oscars he'd just won for Braveheart and he looked extremely pleased with himself, as well he might. I had seen Braveheart a few days earlier and, not surprisingly, hated it. Even by the standards of a film industry in which Englishmen are always cast as villains, Braveheart was a new low. It was a piece of black, anti-British propaganda. Given that Gibson had also made Gallipoli , he clearly ...
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Vincent Price in House on Haunted Hill (1959) - cropped screenshot. Credit: film screenshot (Allied Artists) (Public domain)
Vincent Price in House on Haunted Hill (1959) - cropped screenshot. Credit: film screenshot (Allied Artists) (Public domain)
Vincent Price once lent his famous low-pitched, creaky, atmospheric voice to the 'Phantom of Phantom Manor' at one of Disneyland's theme parks. His eerie English narration, however, was soon replaced by another version because many patrons were complaining about 'the language'. The problem? The theme park, Disneyland Paris, was located in France.