rejections

#rejections

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Mark Twain - Pinhead
Mark Twain was once impressed by the tale of an industrious young man who had been offered a job after he was observed collecting pins which had been dropped on a sidewalk outside a company's offices. Some time later, Twain, intent on working for a certain firm, was seen ostentatiously collecting pins (which he himself had earlier dropped) on the sidewalk facing its windows. Sure enough, having collected several pins, Twain was interrupted by a clerk from the firm. "The boss asked me to tell you to move along," the man explained. "Your idiotic behavior is distracting people working in the office." [Among Twain's patented inventions: an automatically self-adjusting vest strap and a self-pasting scrapbook.]
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When Warren Buffett Told Arnold Schwarzenegger To Raise California's Taxes
Shortly before his victory in the California recall election in 2003, Arnold Schwarzenegger was informed by the investing wizard Warren Buffett (who had volunteered to be his economic counsellor) that Proposition 13* was a chief cause of the state's fiscal problems. Schwarzenegger replied by telling Buffett to forget about raising taxes—and to do 500 sit-ups as a punishment.  [* In 1978, California voters passed a ballot initiative (Proposition 13) which reduced property taxes to 1% of the purchase price, restricted the increase to 2% a year until the next sale of the property, and required a two-thirds majority in both state and local legislatures to approve new taxes.]
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Yuriy Lutsenko & Marie Yovanovitch: Here's Your Do-not-prosecute List
In 2016, shortly after arriving in Kyiv to serve as America's Ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch met with Ukraine's Prosecutor General, Yuriy Lutsenko. Lutsenko, who resented being told what to do, told her, "Look, the people that your Embassy supports are not angels, either." Lutsenko listed some prominent anti-corruption experts and activists whom he claimed the right to investigate, including investigative journalist & parliamentian Sergii Leshchenko; Anti-Corruption Action Center co-founder Vitaliy Shabunin; & Deputy Prosecutor General Vitaky Kasko. As the argument grew more heated, Lutsenko wrote the names on a piece of paper, told Yovanovitch, "This is your do-not-prosecute list," and then, with a dramatic flourish, tore into little pieces. Yovanovitch told Lutsenko, "Of course you have the right to ...
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Abigail Breslin - first boyfriend?
"I heard from this boy that [another boy] had a crush on me. I'm like, 'Ok, whatever.' Then he said, 'Can I have lunch with you?' and I said, 'No.'... Then he said, 'Can I dance for you?' And I said, 'Well, if you have to.' And then he wrote me a poem, but he stole it! From a song!... It said, 'You're so fine you blow my mind'... I can't have a boyfriend right now. It would just complicate my life. I'm struggling on division right now."—9-year-old Abigail Breslin
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Rick James Shopping Spree
"Rick James crashed an in-store benefit at an L.A. boutique last weekend," the San Francisco Examiner reported in November 2002. "He showed up uninvited, hoping to take advantage of the 25 percent discount being offered (the proceeds were being donated to a nonprofit that helps young victims of sexual abuse), but apparently the washed-up superfreak's also a super spender. His credit card was declined."
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William Shatner - caught in the rain
William Shatner: "In Baltimore [in 2004] I was on a long-distance jog when it started to pour. I was on a busy road, and at every stoplight I came to I'd knock on windshields and say, 'Would you mind giving me a ride?' But they all drove off. Here I was, running along the side of the road banging on windows and looking for a lift. I was down to begging, 'Haven't you ever seen Star Trek!?'"
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George Westinghouse & Cornelius Vanderbilt - No Time For Fools
Although Westinghouse's automatic train air brake (patented in 1872) promised a dramatic improvement on the dangerous and slow-acting hand brakes then in use, the conservative railroad companies were wary of its adoption.  When the inventor wrote to Cornelius Vanderbilt, president of the New York Central Railroad, seeking development funds for the brake, his letter was returned with a nasty note: "I have no time to waste on fools." Undetered, Westinghouse approached the Pennsylvania Railroad, whose Alexander J. Cassatt, suitably impressed, agreed to fund the inventor's work.  Some time later Vanderbilt, hearing news of the successful tests, wrote Westinghouse a letter suggesting a meeting. His letter was promptly returned with a nasty note: "I have no time to waste on fools. ...
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When James Cordon Met Harrison Ford And Calista Flockhart Backstage
When the play "One Man, Two Guvnors," starring James Cordon, became a Broadway hit, James Cordon was told that famous people would flock to meet him after the show. In fact, though many stars came to see the play—including David Bowie, Steven Spielberg, & Steve Martin at a single performance—no one went backstage until one memorable day when Harrison Ford and Calista Flockhart came over. "They were there at the bottom of the stairs," Corden later recalled, "and I went over and I said, 'Mister Ford, can I just say, you're the first person who's come back to say hello, and it really means a lot. Thank you so much, it's a real honor to me.' And at that moment, ...
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Kurt Russell - rejections
Kurt Russell was passed over for the title role in An Officer and a Gentleman (1982). He also lost the Han Solo role in Star Wars (1977) and Kevin Costner's role in Bull Durham (1988). "I said, 'Look I understand, you [producers Thom Mount and Mark Burg] can get a better deal with Costner... that's the motion picture business. I hope you fail and die, and see you later!'"
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Shortly after their historic first powered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, in December, 1903, the Wright brothers patriotically offered their plane (Flyer) to the United States Army. The result? The army was so skeptical of the brothers' claims that they refused to see a flight demonstration until 1908. By 1909, the army was using Wright brothers machinery for military use. [The army was, perhaps, understandably skeptical of Flyer: Its wings were made of wood and reinforced with wire, and the propellers were connected to the engine with "sprockets and bicycle chains." Indeed, the Smithsonian Institution and Scientific American magazine were also skeptical. When the Smithsonian refused to acknowledge the plane's historical significance, the Wright brothers sent Flyer to the ...