religion

#religion

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Portrait photograph of Arthur Schopenhauer. Credit: Schäfer, Johann (Public domain)
Portrait photograph of Arthur Schopenhauer. Credit: Schäfer, Johann (Public domain)
While visiting a greenhouse in Dresden one day, Arthur Schopenhauer was approached by a clerk who had noticed him apparently entranced by a certain plant. "Who are you?" the clerk asked, taking him for a specialist. Schopenhauer slowly turned and regarded the man for some time before replying. "If you could only answer that question for me," he finally intoned, "I would be eternally grateful."
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Larry David at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. Credit: David Shankbone (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>)
Larry David at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. Credit: David Shankbone (CC BY 3.0)
Though he was raised in an ethnically Jewish family in Brooklyn, Larry David rejected his faith and identified as an atheist, a fact that led to a few tense moments with religious members of his family and the local Jewish community. "I said to a rabbi," David later recalled of one such incident, "before my nephew's bar mitzvah... he said, 'What's your Hebrew name?' I said, 'I don't know, but you can call me Chip!'"
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Michael J. Lindell in 2018, photo by NorthStarOasis <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>(CC BY-SA 3.0)</a>
Michael J. Lindell in 2018, photo by NorthStarOasis (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Bill Maher: "Mike Lindell, the My Pillow guy, said, 'I see the greatest president in history, of course he is, he was chosen by God.' Mike's pillows are made from foam, but his head is stuffed with feathers." * Lindell, an Evangelical Christian and former crack cocaine addict, invented the My Pillow: an open-cell, poly-foam pillow design.
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Cardinal Jaime Sin (1928-2005) Credit: Wikipedia user Ernmuhl
Cardinal Jaime Sin (1928-2005) Credit: Wikipedia user Ernmuhl
Between 1974 and 2003, the Archbishop of Manila was Jaime Sin, meaning that the Philippines had a "Cardinal Sin."  [A short selection of ironic names: Major Minor (U.S. Army Major), Hastie Love (Convicted Tennessee rapist), A. Moron (Commissioner of Education in the Virgin Islands), Plummer & Leek (Plumbing firm, Norfolk, England), Hyman Pleasure (Assistant Commissioner, New York State Department of Hygiene), Lawless & Lynch (Law firm, Jamaica New York), Cumming & Gooing (Louisiana-based Business)]
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Arthur Blessitt & family
Arthur Blessitt & family
"The longest walk in the world is still going on," The Daily Telegraph reported in 2009. "Arthur Blessitt, a travelling Christian preacher, has been wandering the world since Christmas Day, 1969, when he says he heard the voice of Jesus urging him to walk to every nation, bearing a 12-foot cross. He has walked 1.5 times around the world (more than 60,000 kilometres), been imprisoned many times and lost his cross twice (once thanks to an airline), but keeps on going. More than half the churches Blessitt has asked to look after his cross overnight have refused, but he has never been turned away by a bar or nightclub."
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Peter Sellers (left) in <i>The Pink Panther</i>
Peter Sellers (left) in The Pink Panther
Late one night, after retiring to bed exhausted from a disappointing day wrestling with a troublesome scene in one of the Pink Panther movies, director Blake Edwards was roused by a call from the film's star, Peter Sellers. "I just talked to God!" he exclaimed. "And He told me how to do it!" The next day, although he was skeptical, Edwards humored Sellers and the result was an unmitigated disaster. "Peter," Edwards sighed, "next time you talk to God, tell Him to stay out of show business."
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Trump Free Speech Rally participants in Portland, Oregon, in June 2017. Wikipedia photo from Joe Frazier (<a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>)
Trump Free Speech Rally participants in Portland, Oregon, in June 2017. Wikipedia photo from Joe Frazier (CC BY-SA 2.0)
During the presidential election in 2016, a Trump-supporting tow-truck driver in North Carolina refused to tow a car belonging to a stranded Bernie Sanders supporter. "Something came over me," he later explained. "I think the Lord came to me, and he just said, 'Get in the truck and leave.' And when I got in my truck... I was so proud, because I felt like I finally drew a line in the sand and stood up for what I believed."
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Vatican
A bishop granting plenary indulgences in a fresco by Italian artist Lorenzo Lotto <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>(CC BY-SA 3.0)</a>
A bishop granting plenary indulgences in a fresco by Italian artist Lorenzo Lotto (CC BY-SA 3.0)
From The Guardian: In its latest attempt to keep up with the times the Vatican has married one of its oldest traditions to the world of social media by offering "indulgences" to followers of Pope Francis' tweets. The church's granted indulgences reduce the time Catholics believe they will have to spend in purgatory after they have confessed and been absolved of their sins. The remissions got a bad name in the Middle Ages because unscrupulous churchmen sold them for large sums of money. But now indulgences are being applied to the 21st century. But a senior Vatican official warned web-surfing Catholics that indulgences still required a dose of old-fashioned faith, and that paradise was not just a few mouse clicks ...
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Doris Day in a publicity portrait for Midnight Lace (1960) <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/>(CC BY-SA 3.0)</a>
Doris Day in a publicity portrait for Midnight Lace (1960) (CC BY-SA 3.0)
During an interview one day, Doris Day discussed her conversion in 1948 from Catholicism to Christian Science. "Somehow," she had said in her autobiography, Catholicism "wasn't enough for me." Indeed, Day recalled that ooo she had gone to Confession and made up some sins. Why? "Because," she said, "I didn't want to waste the priest's time." Day, whose credits included such films as Calamity Jane, Do Not Disturb, Midnight Lace, and The Tunnel of Love, left her false sins to the reader's imagination.