satire

#satire

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Business Wire And Webnode
In April 1999, a press release issued over Business Wire announced the creation of a new company called Webnode, which had been granted an exclusive government contract to regulate ownership of 'nodes' on the 'Next Generation Internet.' "The release linked to Webnode's corporate website," hoaxes.org explains, "which offered a 'technical explanation' that nodes were 'points of presence' (pops) on the web, which would be collected into megapops and then into gigapops and that 'connections among gigapops will be negotiated by the gigapops themselves through the Collective Entity.' Numerous media outlets picked up on the story, including Yahoo and Wired, and stock message boards filled with posts from people eager for more info about the company. But would-be Webnode investors were ...
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Journalists Invited To A Soviet Celebration
One day in 1978, at the height of the cold war, 300 foreign correspondents were invited to an official reception in Bonn, Germany, hosted by Soviet Ambassador Valentin Falin, to celebrate "the 10th anniversary of the suppression of counterrevolutionary forces in Czechoslovakia"—an event better known in the West as the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. "How could they have the gall!" one incredulous journalist reportedly exclaimed. The answer? "They" hadn't. The invitations were produced and sent by a clever political satirist with a knack for forgery.
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Trevor Prideaux's Turnip Prizes
In 1998, a Somerset pub-goer named Trevor Prideaux began issuing an annual "Turnip Prize" as a parody of the UK  art world's Turner Prize. The winner in 2003? James Timms' "Take a Leaf From My Chuck," a work inspired by a "freak leaf-blowing accident in a farmyard," comprising a raw chicken stuffed with leaves. * As of 2020, the Turnip Prizes were still being awarded each year in multiple categories.
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Coventry Cathedral, UK
A Comedian Skewers The Reconstruction Of Coventry Cathedral
In the early 1960s, a comedian posing as Sir Basil Spence, the architect behind the reconstruction of Coventry Cathedral after World War II, delivered a mock address at The Establishment in London: "First of all, of course, we owe an enormous debt of gratitude to the German people for making this whole project possible in the first place. Second, we owe a debt of gratitude to the people of Coventry itself, who when asked to choose between having a cathedral and having hospitals, schools and houses, plumped immediately (I'm glad to say) for the cathedral, recognizing, I think, the need of any community to have a place where the whole community can gather together and pray for such things ...
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On April 1st, 2005, Popular Photography magazine ran an article entitled "Can these photos be saved?" about how to remove unsightly wrinkles from photographic subjects. They chose, as an example of a photo that "needed to be saved," Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother" photo taken in 1936 during the Great Depression. Lange's photo is one of the most widely admired in the world. It wouldn't be an exaggeration to describe it as the Mona Lisa of photographs, and the Migrant Mother's stoic expression is what makes the image great. Nevertheless, the editors of Popular Photography erased her wrinkles, softened her gaze, and removed her kids, transforming her from an iconic symbol of endurance into a smooth-faced, worry-free soccer mom. Their readers ...
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Polo Mints' April Fools Prank
On April Fool's Day in 1995, Polo Mints ("the mint with a hole") spoofed the complex regulations mandated by the European Economic Community by running ads in British newspapers announcing that "in accordance with EEC Council Regulation (EC) 631/95" the firm could no longer produce mints containing holes. "This regulation," according to The Museum of Hoaxes, "supposedly required that all producers of 'tubular foodstuffs' delete the holes from their products. To satisfy the regulation, all the existing stock of Polo mints would be supplemented with a 'EURO-CONVERSION KIT' containing twenty 7mm 'Hole Fillers' to be placed inside each Polo mint. A 'detailed instruction leaflet' would also be included."
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Stonehenge, UK
Matt Parker - Dowsing Woolworths
From QI.com: Following the 1921 publication of Alfred Watkins' book The Old Straight Track adherents to dowsing and New Age beliefs claimed Stonehenge stands on the intersection of numerous leys (lines connecting ancient sites which resonate a special 'energy'). To prove this is nonsense mathematician Matt Parker did a similar analysis using the locations of the 800 branches of Woolworths. He found that they could also be mapped onto precise geometrical patterns with the same level of accuracy. He claimed (tongue in cheek) that this pinpoint accuracy suggested that Woolworths managers positioned the stores as a form of 'landmark satnav' allowing travellers to find their nearest pick'n'mix outlet. He could also not rule out the possibility that alien help ...
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Lajitas, Texas
Clay Henry - Texan Mayor
In 1986, Clay Henry was elected mayor of Lajitas, Texas (pop. 100). Clay's claim to fame? He was a beer-drinking goat.
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South Park's Chinese Apology
When the satirical American cartoon "South Park" mocked Chinese censorship, China banned it. Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the show's irreverent creators, promptly issued an apology: "We welcome the Chinese censors into our homes and into our hearts... Xi [Jinping] doesn't look like Winnie the Pooh at all... Long live the Great Communist Party of China! May this autumn's sorghum harvest be bountiful! We good now China?"
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George Fisher - Bill Clinton Caricatures
Bill Clinton: My problems [as Governor of Arkansas] were aggravated by my own lack of experience and my youth. I looked even younger than my thirty-two years [in 1979, his first year in office]. When I became attorney general, George Fisher, the talented cartoonist for the Arkansas Gazette, drew me in a baby carriage. When I became governor he promoted me to a tricycle. It wasn't until I became President that he took me off the tricycle and put me in a pickup truck. And he was a supporter. [Among Fisher's most famous cartoons was a drawing of Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus addressing a session of the Arkansas legislature where everyone present, even the mice and statues, had the face ...