theatre

#theatre

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243 W. 47TH
How Jude Law Got Pranked On Broadway
In 1995, 22-year-old Jude Law made his Broadway debut in a play called "Indiscretions" at New York's Ethel Barrymore Theatre. "There was a scene at the top of Act II," Law later recalled. "The curtain goes up and I'm in a bath talking to my lover. And I have to get out of the bath and dry myself & get dressed. And the guys in the crew knew that on this one night all my friends were there [in the audience], so they filled the bath with ice. You know the little fifty pence you put in to get binoculars in the theater? That went through the roof."
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When James Cordon Met Harrison Ford And Calista Flockhart Backstage
When the play "One Man, Two Guvnors," starring James Cordon, became a Broadway hit, James Cordon was told that famous people would flock to meet him after the show. In fact, though many stars came to see the play—including David Bowie, Steven Spielberg, & Steve Martin at a single performance—no one went backstage until one memorable day when Harrison Ford and Calista Flockhart came over. "They were there at the bottom of the stairs," Corden later recalled, "and I went over and I said, 'Mister Ford, can I just say, you're the first person who's come back to say hello, and it really means a lot. Thank you so much, it's a real honor to me.' And at that moment, ...
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Show Stopped By Flying Ants
One day theatrical producer David N. Morton received a telegram informing him that his theatre in Brisbane was battling an insect infestation: "Show stopped by flying ants," it read. Morton promptly cabled back a reply: "Book them for a further week."
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John Kemble - Baby In The Audience
While performing one evening in a local theater, John Kemble found himself constantly distracted by the crying of an infant child. Finally at wit's end, he approached the front of the stage. "Ladies and gentlemen," he announced, "unless the play is stopped, the child cannot possibly go on."
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When Georges Feydeau Booed His Own Performers
Georges Feydeau's early comedies were not universally well received. At one particularly disastrous debut, the playwright stood preposterously in the aisle and joined the crowd in hissing and booing the performers. "Have you taken leave of your senses?" a friend exclaimed. "This way I can't hear them," Feydeau explained, "and it doesn't hurt so much."
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Robert Morley Insults William Douglas-Home
One day at lunch the playwright William Douglas-Home boasted to actor Robert Morley that Alfred Marks would be appearing in his new play. "I've always admired Mr. Marks tremendously," Morley replied. "Unfortunately, he always seems to choose the wrong play." 
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48th Street Theatre
When Robert Benchley Was Irked By Pidgin English
While attending the premiere of The Squall at the 48th Street Theatre in 1926, humorist Robert Benchley, greatly irritated by the play's extensive use of pidgin English, whispered to his wife that if he heard one more word of it he was going to leave. Shortly thereafter, a gypsy girl on stage prostrated herself at the feet of another character and said: "Me Nubi. Nubi good girl. Me stay." "Me Bobby," Benchley declared, rising to his feet. "Bobby bad boy. Me go." And he did.
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How Barbra Streisand Became A Star
In The Book of Joan, Melissa Rivers recalls how Barbra Streisand got her start in showbiz:   She tried everything to get jobs, but nothing happened for months and months. Finally, in desperation, she sneaked into an audition for The Sound of Music, where they were casting the role of the sixteen-year-old blonde ingénue. You know, an impossibly sweet blonde, nomadic, Aryan, blue-eyed … How can I describe her? A Nazi. Streisand didn't get the job, but somebody in the back of the auditorium heard her audition. He suggested she try singing in nightclubs—any nightclub, for starters. When she did, she was offered the role in the Broadway play I Can Get It for You Wholesale, which led to the lead ...
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Charles Klein's Former Fan
Charles Klein's play The Ne'er Do Well was not universally well-received. At one performance, as the curtain fell, a young lady sitting behind Klein tapped him on the shoulder. "Are you Mr. Klein?" she asked. "Yes," the playwright answered. "Before the curtain rose," the girl continued, "I took the liberty of cutting off a lock of your hair. Now I would like to give it back." [Fun fact: Klein was among those who drowned when a German U-boat sank the Lusitania in 1915.]
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Wayne State
Jeffrey Tambor: When A Fart Is Not A Fart
"I was doing repertory theatre in 1967 in Detroit, Michigan," Jeffrey Tambor once recalled. "It was 1967, the year of the Aisan flu. I had to pull my own curtain to walk on as the 4th baron. I was in faux chain mail. And I went, 'Oh, that [gas] seems a little—oh, what's that? Well, I better get rid of that little gas before I go on.' So I pulled the curtain and kind of [farted], and completely fouled myself… "So I walk on—gloosh, gloosh, gloosh, gloosh, gloosh, gloosh—and I talked to Becket… and I remember him going, 'How are you 4th bar-' [and grimacing]… "We all have those five or six moments where we go, 'I don't know. I ...