tyrants

#tyrants

225 posts
0 followers
97 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Theater Mgr Lilian Baylis Discourages Romance
The famed theater manager Lilian Baylis vehemently discouraged romances between performers in her companies. When a young actor and actress visited her office hand in hand one day, Baylis ignored them for some time before looking up from her desk. "Well," she finally asked, "what is it?" "We're in love, Miss Baylis," the actor tentatively began, "and we—ah—want to get married." "Go away," Baylis barked. "I haven't got time to listen to gossip!"
26 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Antonin Scalia - Thwarting Democracy In Bush V. Gore
Bill Clinton: In December 2000, in the case of Bush v. Gore, [US Supreme Court Chief Justice Antonin Scalia] wrote the Saturday opinion of the Supreme Court granting an unprecedented injunction to stop counting votes in Florida. Three days later, by a 5–4 vote, the Supreme Court gave the election to George W. Bush, partly on the ground that the outstanding disputed ballots couldn't be counted by midnight of that day as Florida law required. Of course not: the Supreme Court had stopped the counting of legal votes three days before. It was an act of judicial activism that might have made even [uber conservative] Bob Bork blush. [According to wikipedia, this was the closest presidential election in the nation's ...
24 views
1 point
0 comments
0 favorites
Winter Palace, Saint
Catherine The Great - Iron Will
Because she did not want anyone to know that her hair was not in fact her own, Catherine the Great kept her wig-maker confined for three years... in an iron cage in her bedroom.
36 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Steely Response
Following Lenin's death, Joseph Stalin unceremoniously eliminated his military and political rivals and quickly emerged as the country's unrivaled dictator. His five-year plans for the collectivization of agriculture and industry were implemented with such brutality that millions were imprisoned or murdered. Lady Astor, visiting Russia in 1931 with a group of English dignitaries, bluntly asked 'the man of steel' how long he planned to continue killing people. His reply? "As long as it's necessary." ["A single death is a tragedy," Stalin once remarked. "A million deaths is a statistic."]
33 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
When Joseph Stalin Refused To Swap Prisoners With Germany
Though many Red Army soldiers were captured by the Nazis during World War II, Joseph Stalin refused to swap prisoners with the Germans. Among the Russian soldiers who died in a German POW camp as a result? Yakov Stalin, Joseph's oldest son.[Stalin's other son, Vassili, died an alcoholic in 1962. His only daughter, Svetlana, adopted her mother's maiden name and wisely fled from the Soviet Union.]
36 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Didius Julianus: Roman Auction
"In 193 A.D., Rome dominated or controlled all of the so-called civilized world. In that year, the Roman praetorian guard—the 12,000 member personal bodyguard of the Caesars—turned on the reigning Emperor Pertinax and murdered him. To fill his seat, one guardsman suggested that the leadership of Rome and the world be auctioned off. "On March 28, 193, the public auction was held. There were two bidders. One was the assassinated emperor's father-in-law. The other was the wealthiest senator in Rome, 61-year-old Didius Julianus. After spirited bidding, Julianus won the throne with a bid of 300 million sesterces. Didius Julianus was unpopular with both the Senate and the Public; his reign lasted only 66 days. The Roman general Severus in Pannonia, ...
35 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Patricia Heaton: Personality Test
A friend once invited "Everybody Loves Raymond" star Patricia Heaton to take an online personality test to see which world leader she most resembled. "She said, 'I'm Bill Clinton,'" Heaton recalled. "'Take this test and see who you are.' So I took the test." The result? "Saddam Hussein!" ["Apparently I am very vain and very bossy," she joked, "and I may have answered that genocide question wrong."]
44 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Oliver Cromwell passes brutal law for brutal soldiers
"In the 17th century, an edict was passed by Lord Protector of England, Oliver Cromwell, that in order to curtail the savage practices of some of his troops (ranging from rape to pillage and murder), a new procedure would be initiated. The offending soldier and his entire company would assemble underneath the local gallows and hold a meeting. "This meeting, in main, would consist of the rolling of dice. Everyone would participate. The man who lost would be hanged. Not necessarily the instigator of the crime, but simply the man who lost. The results were fewer crimes, fewer troops—and fewer meetings."
41 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Idi Amin's secret film case
In 1979, a rebel army of Tanzanians and Ugandan exiles invaded Uganda and deposed the tyrannical president (and alleged cannibal) Idi Amin. Among the curious discoveries in the basement of a government building were dozens of bodies of Amin's political opponents. Among the curious discoveries in Amin's own home? A large case full of old film reels which, upon closer inspection, proved to contain reruns of "I Love Lucy" and "Tom & Jerry" cartoons.
40 views
0 points
0 comments
0 favorites
Saddam Hussein Co-Opts An Artwork
The widely respected Iraqi physician and artist Ala Bashir (who reluctantly served as one of Saddam Hussein's personal physicians), once produced a large installation consisting of two sensuously conjoined blocks of limestone, each about thirty feet high. Bashir designed the shape of one to resemble a woman's back and dubbed the piece "The Union."  Saddam, however, had other ideas: "The Union," it was officially renamed, "Between the Leader and His People."  At least Bashir managed to dissuade Hussein from erecting another statue in front of it, and from adding a replica of one of his fists.