victory

#victory

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New Jersey Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur during a game against the Ottawa Senators at Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, on November 25, 2009. Credit: slgckgc (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">CC BY 2.0</a>)

New Jersey Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur during a game against the Ottawa Senators at Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, ...(more)

"There's a moment when all the aches and pains are worthwhile," New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur declared in 2000, "when you get to hoist the Stanley Cup. Unlike other sports, where the trophy sits behind glass somewhere, in hockey you get to hang out with the Stanley Cup. Everyone on the team gets a turn taking it home. When we won it in 1995, I drove around Montreal with the Cup in the passenger seat—wearing a seat belt. It just about stopped traffic. "This year I took it home and had a party for my buddies. We played a street-hockey game, and we had the Cup on the sidewalk. The police closed the street, and 50 people came ...
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Argentine race car driver Marcelo Bugliotti was delighted to win first prize in the TC 2000 in San Juan (one of the country's most prestigious races)—so much so, in fact, that he stripped naked on the podium, on live television. His antics, he later claimed, were a protest against political corruption in the country. "I did it because the politicians are leaving us all naked," he explained. Alas, race organisers were not pleased. Nor was his wife: "I've tried to talk to her but she won't reply," he explained. "At least my little daughter was more understanding. All she said was 'Daddy, I saw your willy on TV'." [Bugliotti later apologised to the event's sponsors, who were standing beside ...
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Faced with an army of invading Spaniards during the winter of 1572-73, the Dutch in Amsterdam made use of two natural resources in plentiful supply: ingenuity and ice: The wily Dutch defeated the invaders by mobilizing their troops... on skates.
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. Credit: Jacques-Louis David (Public domain)
. Credit: Jacques-Louis David (Public domain)
In 1812, in the path of Napoleon's advancing army, the Russians abandoned the city of Smolensk and torched it. Napoleon, watching with several aides, compared the inferno to an eruption of Vesuvius, and asked rhetorically whether it was indeed a fine sight. "Horrible, sire," an aide replied. Napoleon disagreed: "Remember, gentlemen," he declared, "as a Roman emperor once remarked, 'The corpse of an enemy always smells sweet!'"
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. Credit: Daniel Schultz (Public domain)
. Credit: Daniel Schultz (Public domain)
In 1683, John Sobieski's military brilliance drove the invading Turks back from the walls of Vienna, altering forever the history of central Europe. He soon announced victory to the pope. "I came, I saw..." he declared. And? "God conquered." [A play, of course, on Caesar's famous remark: "I came, I saw, I conquered" (Veni, vidi, vici).]
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Boston Red Sox announcer Curt Gowdy in the early 1950s. Taken from a film in the Prelinger Archive, about the 0:51 mark of the film. Credit: Narrangansett Brewing Company

Boston Red Sox announcer Curt Gowdy in the early 1950s. Taken from a film in the Prelinger Archive, about the ...(more)

On October 3, 1951, the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers played the third game in a best-of-three playoff series. Though the Dodgers had led the Giants by 13 1/2 games on Aug. 7, the Giants had notched a 37 and 7 record in their last 44 games to force a tie-breaker. Though the powerful Dodgers, led by Duke Snider, Jackie Robinson, and Gil Hodges, clung to a 4-1 lead going into the bottom of the ninth, the Giants got three hits in the bottom of the inning to close the score to 4-2. With runners on second and third and one out, Dodgers manager Chuck Dressen called Ralph Branca from the bullpen to replace Don Newcombe and face Bobby ...
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Hồ Chí Minh also known as Nguyễn Ái Quốc. Credit: Unknown author (Public domain)
Hồ Chí Minh also known as Nguyễn Ái Quốc. Credit: Unknown author (Public domain)
In 1990, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Stanley Karnow asked North Vietnam's brilliant General Vo Nguyen Giap how long he would have resisted the American onslaught. "Twenty years, maybe 100 years!" he thundered. "As long as it took to win, regardless of cost." [In 1946, as war with the French loomed, Ho Chi Minh cautioned them: "You can kill 10 of my men for every one I kill of yours, yet even at those odds, you will lose and I will win." In fact, an estimated three million North and South Vietnamese soldiers and civilians died (compared with some 58,000 Americans).]
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. Credit: Jacques-Louis David (Public domain)
. Credit: Jacques-Louis David (Public domain)
"After Marie Tussaud moved her waxwork display to London's Baker Street, in 1835, one of her most regular and enthusiastic visitors was the Duke of Wellington. He would come to look at his own effigy, which was arranged as if in stony conclave with Napoleon. "Then he would look at the relics of the defeated emperor himself: his coach, his toothbrush, a lock of his hair, the bloodstained camp bed on which he had died. By the late 1840s, Napoleon's customised coach was also on show. To the Iron Duke's great satisfaction, the London public was now clambering over the imperial chassis and eating sandwiches inside it."
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When the Minnesota Twins defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1987 World Series, many of the victorious players attributed their victory (4 games to 3) to the unusual charm which they had rubbed for good luck before each game. The charm? Teammate Kirby Puckett's shaved head!
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Tazio Nuvolari sitting in one of his racing cars. Credit: Unknown (Public domain)
Tazio Nuvolari sitting in one of his racing cars. Credit: Unknown (Public domain)
The Italian Tazio Nuvolari, widely considered the greatest Grand Prix driver of all time, won the 1930 Mille Miglia, a gruelling race through the Italian countryside, with the flick of a switch. For most of the race, Nuvolari's Alfa-Romeo trailed Achille Varzi's faster Maserati. With the last part of the 1000-mile race finishing in the dark, however, Nuvolari turned off his lights, leading Varzi to believe that he was well ahead and could ease off the gas. Nuvolari quickly caught his unsuspecting rival and, near the finish, flicked on his lights, flashed past the Maserati, and won the race.