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Nederlands: Lil Kleine (Jorik Scholten). Credit: Namam b.v. (CC BY-SA 4.0)
From The Economist:
In most languages, if someone said you had cancer, it would be a diagnosis. In Dutch, it is more likely to be an insult. Kankerlijer ("cancer-sufferer") is one of a long list of Dutch profanities and expletives derived from diseases. An undesirable person might be told to "typhus off" (optyfussen) or "get consumption" (krijg de tering). If in (American) English you laugh your ass off, in Dutch you might "laugh yourself the pleurisy" (lachen je de pleuris). No one in England has been called a "poxy bitch" for centuries, but in the Netherlands you can still call someone a pokkenteef. A damned long way is a klereneind ("cholera-end"). And so on.

Because expletives are based on social taboos, in most cultures they are linked to sex, excrement or religion. Many Dutch swear words are as well, but they often feel weaker than the medical ones. Schijt is less like its English cognate and more like the gentler French merde. Mierenneuker ("ant-f—er") is an anodyne expression for someone who fusses over details. "Whore" is an insult in Dutch too, but when the rapper Lil' Kleine had a beef with pop singer Anouk [in late 2019], he went with the harsher kankerhoer ("cancer-whore").

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